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10 A/B Split Testing Mistakes That You Make All The Time

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Yes, mistakes happen. There is no need to be surprised because A/B testing can be very tricky. There are some really critical A/B testing mistakes that we all tend to make while we are trying to figure out the best course for increasing conversions.

And truth be told, it is not just you who is prone to making these mistakes. There are many businesses online that get into testing alternatives at their disposal but end up ruining their website instead. A/B tests when done right can in fact save you a lot of time and money but, when gone wrong, eat up all your precious time and drain your resources. So, are you too making any of the following mistakes during an A/B test?

1. You Stopped the Test Too Early

It has been just two days and you have decided to stop the test. You fell prey to your impulse and you just clicked on the “Stop Test” button because you have found or at least you think you have found a winner! Don’t stop the test just yet —chances are that you will end up ignoring the significance of statistics. Always make it a point to aim for above the 95 percent mark before you decide upon a winner.

2. You Set the Test Up Wrong

What? Does that even happen? Yes, and if you make this mistake, it can mean a huge difference in the statistical significance of the two variants. For instance, if you introduce a new variant in the test that just doesn’t register as a part of the original test. Instead, if you decide to introduce a new variant, you should start the A/B test from scratch. Starting a test from scratch puts all variants on the same level and you can easily assess which variant achieves the highest statistical significance.

3. Stopping the Test Too Late

Not stopping the test on time is bad because you end up wasting time. In that time that you wasted you could have started a whole new lineup of tests. Quite frankly, you don’t need to run an A/B test that runs thousands of times over a period of three or four months. You can easily reach a high level of statistical significance long before that. What you should do instead is wait and check the statistical significance each day and also devise a plan to go backward from a goal. This way you don’t waste too much time running a test too long.

4. There Is a Thing Called Too Much Testing

Yes that happens too. This is one of the most common mistakes you will make when you first start an A/B test. You’re obviously excited about optimizing your conversions and you just created two different popup ads for your blog page. You ran the test and one of them has come out a clear winner. But there is a catch; you have made so many changes that the two ads look staggeringly different from each other. You just can’t figure out what worked for your user. So yes start by changing one thing or element per test to know and understand what caused more conversions.

5. Too Many Tests Running On A Page

A/B testing is tricky, as I said that before. Many times a few tests may fail and then a few of them turn out to be not the big winners you were expecting them to be. This is what makes you feel like you need to run a lot of A/B tests. So you run one A/B test and then another and then another on the same page. This way you fall victim to opportunity cost and local maximum and the way out of it is to determine the duration of your A/B test. Know when your webpage hits its local maximum and move on to the next page immediately.

6. Testing the Variation Without Control

Do not even think about deleting the original variant of the site unless you have made proper comparisons and assessments. You will get conversions on the variant for sure but you need to test the statistics simultaneously against those of the original to see which one is doing better.

7. Making a Generalization

This happens a lot, especially when you are running an A/B test that shows a 30 percent increase in conversions from the variant over the control. You would think that it is time to retire the good old design because your conversions are high and you don’t need anything else or better. Don’t go about making assumptions and implementing without running proper tests against the control.

8. A/B Test Tool Installed Wrong

There are tons of tools online that allow you to perform A/B testing. The problem is that it is very difficult to find one particular tool that will be suitable for all kinds of elements on your site. And then there are other mistakes such as:

  • Putting the tracking code in the wrong page.
  • Putting the wrong code or making an error while writing one.
  • Not syncing up the tracking code with your A/B test.
  • Failure of your A/B test tool to track the test on the current plug-in.

The best and the most time saving solution to it is to find a marketing tool that has efficient A/B testing built in.

Testing Insignificant Elements

Do you really think that changing the color of your call to action button or that of the help popup menu would enhance your conversions? A lot of people end up wasting a lot of time on futile things such as these in the hopes of bringing more conversions. The solution is to change your call to action content, edit the headlines and upload more client testimonials through linking with your social media pages and the like. Test things that actually matter.

10. Not Outlining Your Goal

Why are you performing an A/B test in the first place? Don’t do it just because all the big-time marketers out there are telling you to do it. You need to decide what you need to test and how that is going to affect your conversions. If there’s no real goal in place, you will end up just testing something that is not even there and more likely pleases your psychology. Remember, you don’t want any mental satisfaction but statistical facts to measure the success of your site. Long story short, it is not a random test that you perform for the sake of it. You have to understand its importance and purpose that it would solve in the long run for your business.


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Scott Keever is a prominent entrepreneur and the founder of Scott Keever SEO, a renowned SEO company in Tampa. With enormous experience in Internet marketing, Scott Keever has been consistently serving needs of clients into diverse verticals for a long time. As a passionate entrepreneur, Scott Keever loves working with Fortune 300 companies and helping them reach the heights of success.

The post 10 A/B Split Testing Mistakes That You Make All The Time appeared first on SiteProNews.

The highs and lows of enterprise SEO: Which strategies paid off best in 2017?

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

As we come to the end of 2017 and embark on the inevitable dozens of review articles looking back over the past year of search, it’s as good a time as any to reflect on SEO strategy.

What are the greatest challenges being faced by the industry as a whole? What have been the biggest successes? What are companies of different sizes setting as their top priorities for SEO strategy – and how well is it paying off?

To find out, link-building and content marketing agency North Star Inbound, in partnership with seoClarity and BuzzStream, set out to “take the temperature” of enterprise SEO.

They surveyed 240 SEO specialists across the USA from both in-house and agency teams, in a bid to discover how and where enterprise SEO teams are spending their budgets, their most pressing issues, their biggest stumbling blocks, their perception of their own success, and more.

The results shed an intriguing light on what different companies consider to be most important about SEO, how they go about tackling those issues, and which SEO tactics pay the greatest dividends – particularly in terms of how these findings vary across businesses of different sizes, and between in-house and agency SEOs.

So what were the key findings, and what do they mean for the way that SEO is being carried out in 2017-8?

Resources for enterprise SEO: What are they, and where are they going?

How much of a company’s budget and workforce typically gets allocated to SEO? And where do enterprise SEO teams primarily focus their time and attention?

Unsurprisingly, larger companies tend to outspend smaller firms when it comes to SEO, but the study found that companies’ SEO budgets cover the whole range – meaning there is definitely no “magic number” for SEO spend.

The good news (at least for SEOs!) is that the most popular budget was also the largest: 27% of respondents reported that they had a monthly budget of more than $20,000 for SEO. Close to a fifth of companies (19%) had between $5,000 and $10,000 to play with, while a very similar percentage (18%) were allocated less than $1,000.

Perhaps surprisingly, 11% of large companies (with 500+ employees) fell into this bracket – though of course, it’s not just about what you spend on SEO, but how you spend it.

What about people power? The study found that the most common size of SEO team is 2 to 5 members – regardless of the overall size of the company. Two fifths of respondents surveyed (42%) reported working in an SEO team of 2 to 5, while close to a third (32%) had 6 or more people in their team. Nearly a quarter of companies (23%) said that the responsibility for SEO falls on a single person.

Regardless of resources, companies seemed to broadly agree on their priorities for SEO. When asked to rank four areas of SEO in order of priority, respondents from companies of all sizes reported that their top priority was technical SEO.

Second, third and fourth priorities were – again regardless of company size – content development, traffic analysis, and link building, respectively.

But maybe enterprise SEOs should be putting more emphasis on link-building, as survey respondents overwhelmingly described it as the most difficult SEO strategy to execute. Well over half of respondents (58%) ranked it top out of a list of eight, with small companies (with 1-100 employees) feeling the pain most of all.

Why is link-building proving such a tough nut to crack? Let’s look at how enterprise SEOs are tackling link-building.

All about link-building

Well over half of survey respondents reported that link-building was their most difficult strategy to execute, although there were some noticeable variations by size. 68% of small companies rated link-building as the most challenging part of SEO, followed by 62% of medium-size companies and 42% of large companies.

But the difficulties associated with link-building aren’t preventing SEOs from investing in it. 85% of respondents, across all business sizes, reported that they will be maintaining or increasing their link-building budgets this year.

Large companies were most likely to be maintaining their link-building budgets, with 49% reporting they would be keeping their budget for link-building “about the same”, while small companies were most likely to be increasing their budget.

Link-building can be done in a huge number of ways, but there were clear frontrunners for the most effective strategies. SEOs from small, medium and large firms all reported that public relations is their most beneficial tactic for link-building, though for small company SEOs, guest posts came a very close second.

Other effective strategies included infographics (third-most effective for large companies of 500+ employees), local citations/directories (which came in third for small companies), and resource links (which ranked third for medium-sized companies, joint with local citations).

Paid links and comments were universally rated as the least effective strategies by all respondents, though this may also be due to a lack of employing these tactics in the first place – Google penalizes almost all types of paid links, and discourages systematic blog commenting as a method of link-building.

Which companies have been seeing the most success with link-building as an SEO strategy? When asked to rate their most successful strategy over the past 12 months, respondents overwhelmingly pointed to technical on-site optimization: 65% of large companies, 67% of medium-sized companies and 53% of smaller firms rated it as their most effective SEO tactic.

For small companies, blogging and link-building follow close behind, with 35% of SEOs from small firms reporting success with blogging for SEO, and 33% reporting that link-building was their most successful tactic. This was not so for large companies, for whom link-building ranked a distant 6th out of 7 SEO strategies, with just 14% saying it was their most successful strategy.

We know that small firms are more likely to have increased their budgets for link-building in the past year, so perhaps this extra resource towards link-building is making all the difference. But this is something of a chicken-and-egg style conundrum: are small companies allocating more budget towards link-building because it’s successful, or are they successful with link-building because of the extra budget?

Small companies are also more likely to be employing local-level link-building tactics such as local directories or citations. Link-building at a local level can be highly effective when carried out correctly, so perhaps this added emphasis on local SEO is making the difference for enterprise SEOs at small firms.

Finally, which KPIs are SEOs using to track their success with link-building? The favored metrics are Moz Domain Authority and Page Authority, together with the number of linking root domains (both used by 52% of SEOs).

The relevance of the linking page is third-most-used at 47%, while Majestic’s “Trust Flow” metric trails behind on 27%.

Agency vs in-house: Who’s winning at SEO?

Of the 240 SEO specialists surveyed for the study, two-thirds were in-house SEOs, while the remaining third worked for an agency. What differences in approach and outlook did the survey find between these two groups?

When it comes to organizational challenges, agency and in-house SEOs differ slightly on what they consider to be the most pressing issues. Agency SEOs are more likely to encounter challenges with finding SEO talent (44% reported this as their most challenging obstacle) or demonstrating ROI (41%).

For in-house SEOs, developing the right content was their most pressing obstacle (reported by 42% of respondents), while demonstrating ROI was again a key challenge, faced by close to two-fifths of in-house SEOs (37%). Agency SEOs were least likely to struggle with allocating the right resources, with only 18% reporting this as a top organizational challenge, while in-house SEOs struggled least with securing budget (21%) but were more likely to encounter challenges in allocating it (31%).

But the real differences came in the way that agency and in-house SEOs perceived their own success. Agency SEOs were vastly more likely to be confident about their own success: 40% of agency respondents rated themselves as “Successful – we’re absolutely crushing it” compared with just 13% of in-house SEO teams.

However, perhaps in-house SEOs are just modest, as almost half (49%) rated their SEO success as “Positive – we’re doing well enough” (versus 39% of agency SEOs).

In-house SEOs were also more likely to report being “frustrated” with their SEO outcomes (the lowest possible rating) than agencies – 8% of them gave their SEO efforts this rating, compared with only 3% of agency respondents.

Key takeaways

What do the findings from the study tell us about the state of enterprise SEO? While SEO will always depend somewhat on the individual circumstances of an organization, there are some broad conclusions we can draw from the data.

  • SEO as a discipline appears to be well-resourced overall, demonstrating that companies consider SEO a branch of marketing worth investing in. The challenge is therefore more often deciding how and where to allocate those resources, rather than a lack of resources.
  • Technical SEO is a top priority and a top source of success for enterprise SEOs, while companies seem less sure of where they stand with link-building. Many are putting budget into it without necessarily being satisfied with or confident in the results.
  • While some SEO mainstays (like technical on-site SEO) are effective regardless of company size, the effectiveness of SEO strategies often depends on the size of a company, with smaller companies seeing much more success with strategies like blogging than larger organizations.
  • Agency SEOs are much more likely to feel confident in their SEO success than in-house teams, in spite of reported difficulties with securing the right talent for SEO. However, both in-house and agency SEO teams face difficulties with proving the ROI of SEO, showing perhaps that this perceived success can be difficult to translate into hard numbers for the benefit of the higher-ups.

The highs and lows of enterprise SEO: Which strategies paid off best in 2017?

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

As we come to the end of 2017 and embark on the inevitable dozens of review articles looking back over the past year of search, it’s as good a time as any to reflect on SEO strategy.

What are the greatest challenges being faced by the industry as a whole? What have been the biggest successes? What are companies of different sizes setting as their top priorities for SEO strategy – and how well is it paying off?

To find out, link-building and content marketing agency North Star Inbound, in partnership with seoClarity and BuzzStream, set out to “take the temperature” of enterprise SEO.

They surveyed 240 SEO specialists across the USA from both in-house and agency teams, in a bid to discover how and where enterprise SEO teams are spending their budgets, their most pressing issues, their biggest stumbling blocks, their perception of their own success, and more.

The results shed an intriguing light on what different companies consider to be most important about SEO, how they go about tackling those issues, and which SEO tactics pay the greatest dividends – particularly in terms of how these findings vary across businesses of different sizes, and between in-house and agency SEOs.

So what were the key findings, and what do they mean for the way that SEO is being carried out in 2017-8?

Resources for enterprise SEO: What are they, and where are they going?

How much of a company’s budget and workforce typically gets allocated to SEO? And where do enterprise SEO teams primarily focus their time and attention?

Unsurprisingly, larger companies tend to outspend smaller firms when it comes to SEO, but the study found that companies’ SEO budgets cover the whole range – meaning there is definitely no “magic number” for SEO spend.

The good news (at least for SEOs!) is that the most popular budget was also the largest: 27% of respondents reported that they had a monthly budget of more than $20,000 for SEO. Close to a fifth of companies (19%) had between $5,000 and $10,000 to play with, while a very similar percentage (18%) were allocated less than $1,000.

Perhaps surprisingly, 11% of large companies (with 500+ employees) fell into this bracket – though of course, it’s not just about what you spend on SEO, but how you spend it.

What about people power? The study found that the most common size of SEO team is 2 to 5 members – regardless of the overall size of the company. Two fifths of respondents surveyed (42%) reported working in an SEO team of 2 to 5, while close to a third (32%) had 6 or more people in their team. Nearly a quarter of companies (23%) said that the responsibility for SEO falls on a single person.

Regardless of resources, companies seemed to broadly agree on their priorities for SEO. When asked to rank four areas of SEO in order of priority, respondents from companies of all sizes reported that their top priority was technical SEO.

Second, third and fourth priorities were – again regardless of company size – content development, traffic analysis, and link building, respectively.

But maybe enterprise SEOs should be putting more emphasis on link-building, as survey respondents overwhelmingly described it as the most difficult SEO strategy to execute. Well over half of respondents (58%) ranked it top out of a list of eight, with small companies (with 1-100 employees) feeling the pain most of all.

Why is link-building proving such a tough nut to crack? Let’s look at how enterprise SEOs are tackling link-building.

All about link-building

Well over half of survey respondents reported that link-building was their most difficult strategy to execute, although there were some noticeable variations by size. 68% of small companies rated link-building as the most challenging part of SEO, followed by 62% of medium-size companies and 42% of large companies.

But the difficulties associated with link-building aren’t preventing SEOs from investing in it. 85% of respondents, across all business sizes, reported that they will be maintaining or increasing their link-building budgets this year.

Large companies were most likely to be maintaining their link-building budgets, with 49% reporting they would be keeping their budget for link-building “about the same”, while small companies were most likely to be increasing their budget.

Link-building can be done in a huge number of ways, but there were clear frontrunners for the most effective strategies. SEOs from small, medium and large firms all reported that public relations is their most beneficial tactic for link-building, though for small company SEOs, guest posts came a very close second.

Other effective strategies included infographics (third-most effective for large companies of 500+ employees), local citations/directories (which came in third for small companies), and resource links (which ranked third for medium-sized companies, joint with local citations).

Paid links and comments were universally rated as the least effective strategies by all respondents, though this may also be due to a lack of employing these tactics in the first place – Google penalizes almost all types of paid links, and discourages systematic blog commenting as a method of link-building.

Which companies have been seeing the most success with link-building as an SEO strategy? When asked to rate their most successful strategy over the past 12 months, respondents overwhelmingly pointed to technical on-site optimization: 65% of large companies, 67% of medium-sized companies and 53% of smaller firms rated it as their most effective SEO tactic.

For small companies, blogging and link-building follow close behind, with 35% of SEOs from small firms reporting success with blogging for SEO, and 33% reporting that link-building was their most successful tactic. This was not so for large companies, for whom link-building ranked a distant 6th out of 7 SEO strategies, with just 14% saying it was their most successful strategy.

We know that small firms are more likely to have increased their budgets for link-building in the past year, so perhaps this extra resource towards link-building is making all the difference. But this is something of a chicken-and-egg style conundrum: are small companies allocating more budget towards link-building because it’s successful, or are they successful with link-building because of the extra budget?

Small companies are also more likely to be employing local-level link-building tactics such as local directories or citations. Link-building at a local level can be highly effective when carried out correctly, so perhaps this added emphasis on local SEO is making the difference for enterprise SEOs at small firms.

Finally, which KPIs are SEOs using to track their success with link-building? The favored metrics are Moz Domain Authority and Page Authority, together with the number of linking root domains (both used by 52% of SEOs).

The relevance of the linking page is third-most-used at 47%, while Majestic’s “Trust Flow” metric trails behind on 27%.

Agency vs in-house: Who’s winning at SEO?

Of the 240 SEO specialists surveyed for the study, two-thirds were in-house SEOs, while the remaining third worked for an agency. What differences in approach and outlook did the survey find between these two groups?

When it comes to organizational challenges, agency and in-house SEOs differ slightly on what they consider to be the most pressing issues. Agency SEOs are more likely to encounter challenges with finding SEO talent (44% reported this as their most challenging obstacle) or demonstrating ROI (41%).

For in-house SEOs, developing the right content was their most pressing obstacle (reported by 42% of respondents), while demonstrating ROI was again a key challenge, faced by close to two-fifths of in-house SEOs (37%). Agency SEOs were least likely to struggle with allocating the right resources, with only 18% reporting this as a top organizational challenge, while in-house SEOs struggled least with securing budget (21%) but were more likely to encounter challenges in allocating it (31%).

But the real differences came in the way that agency and in-house SEOs perceived their own success. Agency SEOs were vastly more likely to be confident about their own success: 40% of agency respondents rated themselves as “Successful – we’re absolutely crushing it” compared with just 13% of in-house SEO teams.

However, perhaps in-house SEOs are just modest, as almost half (49%) rated their SEO success as “Positive – we’re doing well enough” (versus 39% of agency SEOs).

In-house SEOs were also more likely to report being “frustrated” with their SEO outcomes (the lowest possible rating) than agencies – 8% of them gave their SEO efforts this rating, compared with only 3% of agency respondents.

Key takeaways

What do the findings from the study tell us about the state of enterprise SEO? While SEO will always depend somewhat on the individual circumstances of an organization, there are some broad conclusions we can draw from the data.

  • SEO as a discipline appears to be well-resourced overall, demonstrating that companies consider SEO a branch of marketing worth investing in. The challenge is therefore more often deciding how and where to allocate those resources, rather than a lack of resources.
  • Technical SEO is a top priority and a top source of success for enterprise SEOs, while companies seem less sure of where they stand with link-building. Many are putting budget into it without necessarily being satisfied with or confident in the results.
  • While some SEO mainstays (like technical on-site SEO) are effective regardless of company size, the effectiveness of SEO strategies often depends on the size of a company, with smaller companies seeing much more success with strategies like blogging than larger organizations.
  • Agency SEOs are much more likely to feel confident in their SEO success than in-house teams, in spite of reported difficulties with securing the right talent for SEO. However, both in-house and agency SEO teams face difficulties with proving the ROI of SEO, showing perhaps that this perceived success can be difficult to translate into hard numbers for the benefit of the higher-ups.

Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google has come out on top in a gender discrimination lawsuit after a Superior Court judge rejected a class action claim against the tech titan.

The lawsuit, filed September in San Francisco Superior Court, alleged Google “engaged in systemic and pervasive pay and promotion discrimination.” In other words, it allegedly paid its male employees more than their female counterparts.

The judge, however, said the class action suit was “overbroad,” adding it did not “purport to distinguish between female employees who may have valid claims against Google based upon its alleged conduct from those who do not.”

Had the judge granted the lawsuit class action status, it would have represented thousands of Google employees in California.

The suit was filed on behalf of three female former Google employees — Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, and Kelli Wisuri — all of who worked at the company’s Mountain View headquarters. The lawsuit said the women left the company after allegedly being forced onto career tracks with compensation that was less than their male peers.

Google, however, said it has no gender pay gap and told CNN  it pays women 99.7 cents to each dollar a man receives.

Google spokeswoman Gina Scigliano, in a statement at the time the lawsuit was launched, said the company is very careful about equal pay for equal work.

“Job levels and promotions are determined through rigorous hiring and promotion committees, and must pass multiple levels of review, including checks to make sure there is no gender bias in these decisions,” Scigliano said.

“And we have extensive systems in place to ensure that we pay fairly. But on all these topics, if we ever see individual discrepancies or problems, we work to fix them.”


avatar

The post Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit appeared first on SiteProNews.

Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google has come out on top in a gender discrimination lawsuit after a Superior Court judge rejected a class action claim against the tech titan.

The lawsuit, filed September in San Francisco Superior Court, alleged Google “engaged in systemic and pervasive pay and promotion discrimination.” In other words, it allegedly paid its male employees more than their female counterparts.

The judge, however, said the class action suit was “overbroad,” adding it did not “purport to distinguish between female employees who may have valid claims against Google based upon its alleged conduct from those who do not.”

Had the judge granted the lawsuit class action status, it would have represented thousands of Google employees in California.

The suit was filed on behalf of three female former Google employees — Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, and Kelli Wisuri — all of who worked at the company’s Mountain View headquarters. The lawsuit said the women left the company after allegedly being forced onto career tracks with compensation that was less than their male peers.

Google, however, said it has no gender pay gap and told CNN  it pays women 99.7 cents to each dollar a man receives.

Google spokeswoman Gina Scigliano, in a statement at the time the lawsuit was launched, said the company is very careful about equal pay for equal work.

“Job levels and promotions are determined through rigorous hiring and promotion committees, and must pass multiple levels of review, including checks to make sure there is no gender bias in these decisions,” Scigliano said.

“And we have extensive systems in place to ensure that we pay fairly. But on all these topics, if we ever see individual discrepancies or problems, we work to fix them.”


avatar

The post Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit appeared first on SiteProNews.

Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google has come out on top in a gender discrimination lawsuit after a Superior Court judge rejected a class action claim against the tech titan.

The lawsuit, filed September in San Francisco Superior Court, alleged Google “engaged in systemic and pervasive pay and promotion discrimination.” In other words, it allegedly paid its male employees more than their female counterparts.

The judge, however, said the class action suit was “overbroad,” adding it did not “purport to distinguish between female employees who may have valid claims against Google based upon its alleged conduct from those who do not.”

Had the judge granted the lawsuit class action status, it would have represented thousands of Google employees in California.

The suit was filed on behalf of three female former Google employees — Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, and Kelli Wisuri — all of who worked at the company’s Mountain View headquarters. The lawsuit said the women left the company after allegedly being forced onto career tracks with compensation that was less than their male peers.

Google, however, said it has no gender pay gap and told CNN  it pays women 99.7 cents to each dollar a man receives.

Google spokeswoman Gina Scigliano, in a statement at the time the lawsuit was launched, said the company is very careful about equal pay for equal work.

“Job levels and promotions are determined through rigorous hiring and promotion committees, and must pass multiple levels of review, including checks to make sure there is no gender bias in these decisions,” Scigliano said.

“And we have extensive systems in place to ensure that we pay fairly. But on all these topics, if we ever see individual discrepancies or problems, we work to fix them.”


avatar

The post Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit appeared first on SiteProNews.

Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google has come out on top in a gender discrimination lawsuit after a Superior Court judge rejected a class action claim against the tech titan.

The lawsuit, filed September in San Francisco Superior Court, alleged Google “engaged in systemic and pervasive pay and promotion discrimination.” In other words, it allegedly paid its male employees more than their female counterparts.

The judge, however, said the class action suit was “overbroad,” adding it did not “purport to distinguish between female employees who may have valid claims against Google based upon its alleged conduct from those who do not.”

Had the judge granted the lawsuit class action status, it would have represented thousands of Google employees in California.

The suit was filed on behalf of three female former Google employees — Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, and Kelli Wisuri — all of who worked at the company’s Mountain View headquarters. The lawsuit said the women left the company after allegedly being forced onto career tracks with compensation that was less than their male peers.

Google, however, said it has no gender pay gap and told CNN  it pays women 99.7 cents to each dollar a man receives.

Google spokeswoman Gina Scigliano, in a statement at the time the lawsuit was launched, said the company is very careful about equal pay for equal work.

“Job levels and promotions are determined through rigorous hiring and promotion committees, and must pass multiple levels of review, including checks to make sure there is no gender bias in these decisions,” Scigliano said.

“And we have extensive systems in place to ensure that we pay fairly. But on all these topics, if we ever see individual discrepancies or problems, we work to fix them.”


avatar

The post Google the Victor in Pay Discrimination Lawsuit appeared first on SiteProNews.

Dom Hofmann Teases Vine Alternative in Cryptic Tweet

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Vine may just be making a comeback.

Vine co-founder Don Hofmann, in a few vague tweets, hinted that he has something up his sleeve to replace the void left by the shuttering of the six-second video service in January.

“I’m going to work on a follow-up to Vine. I’ve been feeling it myself for some time and have seen a lot of tweets, dms, etc.,”  Hofmann tweeted.

“I’m funding it myself as an outside project, so it doesn’t interfere with the (quite exciting) work we’re doing at the company, which is my first priority. Nothing else to share yet, but more as it develops.”

He also tweeted a possible logo for the new Vine: a green rectangle with Vine’s original V logo followed by the number 2.

Whether the means it will be called Vine 2 or V2 is anyone’s guess.

Replies to Hofmann’s tweet show enthusiasm for the resurrection of Vine.

I say on a weekly basis that Vine needs to exist and there’s a real demand for it

— Niv Dror (@Nivo0o0) November 30, 2017

Yep. Vine seemed like it was killed just at the wrong time (see: “stories” taking over every platform)

— Jeremy Burge (@jeremyburge) November 30, 2017

There were also a number of offers of money to back the new project.

Let me invest in it and back it

— Brennen Taylor (@BrennenTaylor) November 30, 2017

Count me in boys

— RyansAverageLife (@RyanAbe) November 30, 2017

Vine was founded in June 2012 and was purchased by Twitter just five months later, just prior to its official launch. Four years later, in October of 2016, Twitter announced it would be shutting Vine down come the New Year.

News of Vine’s demise came shortly after Twitter’s announcement that it would be laying off nine percent of its workforce: between 300 and 350 people.


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Jennifer Cowan is the Managing Editor for SiteProNews.

The post Dom Hofmann Teases Vine Alternative in Cryptic Tweet appeared first on SiteProNews.

Dom Hofmann Teases Vine Alternative in Cryptic Tweet

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Vine may just be making a comeback.

Vine co-founder Don Hofmann, in a few vague tweets, hinted that he has something up his sleeve to replace the void left by the shuttering of the six-second video service in January.

“I’m going to work on a follow-up to Vine. I’ve been feeling it myself for some time and have seen a lot of tweets, dms, etc.,”  Hofmann tweeted.

“I’m funding it myself as an outside project, so it doesn’t interfere with the (quite exciting) work we’re doing at the company, which is my first priority. Nothing else to share yet, but more as it develops.”

He also tweeted a possible logo for the new Vine: a green rectangle with Vine’s original V logo followed by the number 2.

Whether the means it will be called Vine 2 or V2 is anyone’s guess.

Replies to Hofmann’s tweet show enthusiasm for the resurrection of Vine.

I say on a weekly basis that Vine needs to exist and there’s a real demand for it

— Niv Dror (@Nivo0o0) November 30, 2017

Yep. Vine seemed like it was killed just at the wrong time (see: “stories” taking over every platform)

— Jeremy Burge (@jeremyburge) November 30, 2017

There were also a number of offers of money to back the new project.

Let me invest in it and back it

— Brennen Taylor (@BrennenTaylor) November 30, 2017

Count me in boys

— RyansAverageLife (@RyanAbe) November 30, 2017

Vine was founded in June 2012 and was purchased by Twitter just five months later, just prior to its official launch. Four years later, in October of 2016, Twitter announced it would be shutting Vine down come the New Year.

News of Vine’s demise came shortly after Twitter’s announcement that it would be laying off nine percent of its workforce: between 300 and 350 people.


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Jennifer Cowan is the Managing Editor for SiteProNews.

The post Dom Hofmann Teases Vine Alternative in Cryptic Tweet appeared first on SiteProNews.

Dom Hofmann Teases Vine Alternative in Cryptic Tweet

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Vine may just be making a comeback.

Vine co-founder Don Hofmann, in a few vague tweets, hinted that he has something up his sleeve to replace the void left by the shuttering of the six-second video service in January.

“I’m going to work on a follow-up to Vine. I’ve been feeling it myself for some time and have seen a lot of tweets, dms, etc.,”  Hofmann tweeted.

“I’m funding it myself as an outside project, so it doesn’t interfere with the (quite exciting) work we’re doing at the company, which is my first priority. Nothing else to share yet, but more as it develops.”

He also tweeted a possible logo for the new Vine: a green rectangle with Vine’s original V logo followed by the number 2.

Whether the means it will be called Vine 2 or V2 is anyone’s guess.

Replies to Hofmann’s tweet show enthusiasm for the resurrection of Vine.

I say on a weekly basis that Vine needs to exist and there’s a real demand for it

— Niv Dror (@Nivo0o0) November 30, 2017

Yep. Vine seemed like it was killed just at the wrong time (see: “stories” taking over every platform)

— Jeremy Burge (@jeremyburge) November 30, 2017

There were also a number of offers of money to back the new project.

Let me invest in it and back it

— Brennen Taylor (@BrennenTaylor) November 30, 2017

Count me in boys

— RyansAverageLife (@RyanAbe) November 30, 2017

Vine was founded in June 2012 and was purchased by Twitter just five months later, just prior to its official launch. Four years later, in October of 2016, Twitter announced it would be shutting Vine down come the New Year.

News of Vine’s demise came shortly after Twitter’s announcement that it would be laying off nine percent of its workforce: between 300 and 350 people.


avatar

Jennifer Cowan is the Managing Editor for SiteProNews.

The post Dom Hofmann Teases Vine Alternative in Cryptic Tweet appeared first on SiteProNews.