5 Ways To Improve The Conversion Rate Of Your Website

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Have you invested in a website, generated lots of traffic to it, and then seen no leads or sales? One of the most important elements for the success of a business website is the conversion rate. It is a metric that can determine your return of investment from your online marketing.

A conversion rate can be defined as the percentage of website visitors who complete an action such as a purchase, fill in a form or subscribe to a mailing list. As often is the case with online marketing campaigns, people often focus on generating traffic to a website but overlook the key metric that is the conversion rate.

If you have a website that attracts 10,000 users every month but produces no leads or sales, then it is not generating revenue for your business.

How can you improve the conversion rate of your website?

Below are some important tips that can greatly help improve the conversion of your business website or eCommerce store:

1. Proper Use of Call to Actions

Strategic call to actions on a website is vital for conversion. Call to actions engage and prompt visitors to take action by filling in a contact form, making a purchase or simply signing up to your subscribers list.

The most popular website call to actions include:

• Buttons
• Text links
• Popup forms

These three types of call to actions can work differently and produce different results.

Buttons can be effective on eCommerce websites and usually buttons in vibrant colors help engage visitors to make contact or to visit an online store.

It is important that you A/B test buttons on your website to ensure you maximise your conversions. Having too many buttons leading visitors to different areas of your website can have the same effect as “banner blindness” where users subconsciously ignore calls to action.

Probably still the most effective call to actions are text links. Text links are simply a link on a piece of text within your content. When visitors are engaged with your content, they are less likely to experience the “blindness” that is sometimes the case with buttons.

Popup forms can also be highly effective; however, it is important that they are used strategically to ensure an optimal user experience and to avoid a Google penalty. Popup forms are great for obtaining email addresses which can be used for your email marketing campaigns. For best results, try using popups that appear at a certain stage of a visitor’s journey through your website or when a user attempts to leave your website.

2. On-site Credibility Factors

One element for a customer that can be the difference between making a purchase or clicking off your site is trust. To build trust, there are a variety of subtle but highly effective credibility factors that can be added to your site to prove your authority and build trust with visitors to turn them into leads or customers.

These factors include:

• Customer Testimonials
• Logos from accreditations and governing bodies
• Qualifications
• Logos of leading publications where you/your business have been mentioned

Having real and positive customer testimonials on your website can boost your credibility by generating social proof. Testimonials can help people identify that your product/service can solve a problem that they have.

Logos of recognized accreditations from awarding and governing bodies of professions etc. on a website will help improve your credibility as well. If you have been mentioned or featured in a major publication, cite this on your website as well to further your authority.

3. Simple Website User Flow

When visitors land on your website looking for a product or service, they should find the information and solution they need to solve their problems. The visitor should be able to easily make contact, or in the case of an eCommerce store, proceed to make a purchase quickly.

Reducing the number of clicks needed to find products, to add to the basket, fill out the payment and delivery information and to checkout is essential for eCommerce conversions.

Website speed is also critical for conversion rates. If customers have to wait for your pages to load, they will get frustrated and click away to find other websites. Speed issues can also affect your bounce rates and time spent on site which ultimately may lower your rankings on Google.

4. Accurate Information

To improve the conversion rate on your website, you must ensure that the information about your services and/or products is accurate. If there are discrepancies in the information or inconsistencies in the content throughout your website, it can seriously affect the rate of website conversions. Accuracy of information is important for eCommerce store customer service and delivery information. For example, if you state somewhere on your website that delivery takes three days, whereas another page on your site states four days, this can cause customer confusion and raise questions about whether your company is true to its word or not.

5. Reputation Management

Have you made many purchases from a website you have never heard of before without checking out online reviews? Have you booked a hotel recently without reading reviews online? It is highly unlikely.

People will generally review companies and products for user reviews before making an informed decision to make a purchase. For this reason, it is very important that you have a reputation management strategy in place to protect your brand and to address issues that your customers may have with your services or products. If your brand has genuine positive reviews on different user generated review websites and on social media, your conversion rate is likely to rise as potential customers begin to trust your brand.

The conversion rate of a website should be the key metric in determining the success of an online marketing campaign. It should be the one element that you concentrate on to improve your online revenue.


avatar

Joseph Doohan is an SEO specialist at Wurkhouse, a creative digital agency based in the UK. He has helped many domestic companies grow into international markets through high end SEO campaigns. His positivity quotes and helpful tips can also be found on Twitter.

The post 5 Ways To Improve The Conversion Rate Of Your Website appeared first on SiteProNews.

Three tips for a content marketing plan that makes your customers the central focus

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

In an era of constant digital distractions, how do we compete long enough to convert? The trick is to make your content as customer focused as possible.

Content marketing is a constant struggle for any brand. It is probably the most important element to their overall promotional strategy and the greatest tool at their disposal.

It can also be the most fickle, as it relies heavily on keeping and maintaining the interest of the ones consuming it.

You need to focus on your customer! This allows what you produce to immediately connect with your audience and provides something of value to them. Not only does this give you benefits in the moment by offering the information they want/need, it also gives you long-term benefits by establishing the authority of your brand.

Here are three tips and tools to help you create a customer-focused content marketing strategy.

1. Be clear on content objectives

Try to figure out just what the aims of your content will be. If there are no objectives to work from, the results will end up aimless and meandering, not really benefiting anyone, even if it manages to drive a bit of traffic. It is like throwing spaghetti at a wall… sure, some of it is going to stick, but most of it is going to end up on the floor.

So, what is it you want to achieve with each piece of content? How can you create a cohesive strategy that matches each of those objectives? How will you measure success towards those goals?

First things first: Do some keyword research and see what it is your customers want to know about. What are they struggling with? What is upsetting/confusing/angering/interesting them? How can you make their life easier through your content?

Just looking at your keyword lists won’t tell you much though. You need to work on organizing your keywords. This will help you lay out a clear content strategy.

I use spreadsheets to organize and label my keywords so that it becomes clear how to better serve the people behind using them to search.

Break keywords into groups by relevancy

This will allow you to better understand your niche and target one page to the whole group of keywords, versus each of them individually.

Keyword clustering is an effective tactic to use here. Serpstat does it pretty well by determining how many URLs overlap for different search queries and thus identifying closely related phrases. (Read more about the tactic in our dedicated guide to keyword clustering).

Serpstat clustering

From there, determine intent behind each group

Keyword intent reflects the users’ aim behind searching. It helps you to better serve your audience needs and thus improve your conversion rate. I usually label my keyword groups with four types of user intent:

  • Commercial: No need trying to serve them content here: These people are ready to buy!
  • Transitional: These people are likely to still be in the research phase but they may be willing to buy after you give them some actionable content. Product reviews and gift ideas are perfect content assets for this group
  • Navigational: Those keywords that content the brand name. Firstly, we want to make sure our brand ranks #1 for these. Secondly, we want to use these keywords to better understand possible problems with the site or the product
  • Informational: These people are searching for information only. The perfect CTA for this content is an invite to subscribe.

Label seasonal content

Last but not least, you want to make sure you publish that content when you audience needs it most. If it looks like certain content is likely to solve a seasonal problem or catch seasonal interest peak – or more often than not, both – keep it scheduled for that season.

Organize keywords

2. Go straight to the source

You need to know what is important to the people who you are targeting. Knowing your audience is always going to be the leading step before you do anything else. Yet, an astonishing number of brands fail in this regard and create not what customers really want or need, but what they assume they want or need. The difference between those two things is not so much as gap as it is a cavern.

My personal preference for doing this is through customer feedback surveys. You have to be careful using these helpful little info gathering tools because if they are too long, hard to complete or just biased it is going to annoy the customer.

I use Wyzzer to put together 60 second surveys of up to 25 questions that are fast and easy to click. They even present it a little game, so the surveys are more engaging.

It’s a nice little way to achieve several goals at a time:

  • Let your customers tell you more about themselves (What do they like? What are their life choices? What are their hobbies?)
  • Entertain your readers and engage more of them by gamifying the surveying process
  • Diversify your content by adding something new.

wyzerr

There are also several polling plugins that integrate into your WordPress blog easily. You can use these to quickly poll your customers on important matters, learn if they need a follow-up to a certain article or ask them which direction to take with your upcoming content series.

3. Map out the customer journey

Every customer goes through a journey from the moment they learn of your brand. It starts with the first lead, making them aware of your product. It ends not with the sale (as some believe), but with the experience afterward and how they feel about your brand. By the time they reach that stage they have completed the journey that you are responsible for guiding them through.

Having a clearly mapped journey with stages is one of the best things you can do. You can create content for every step, from the first landing on your website to the social reviews at the very end.

Research brand-focused keywords

I have already mentioned navigational queries and how they also should be used to better understand where your brand is lacking. Looking at how customers are searching for your brand may be eye opening?

Do they have problem finding how to log in? To they think your product is too expensive? Are they looking for alternative ways to get in touch with you?

Brand focused keywords

All of these signal of one common problem: Those people must have already visited your site but they are now searching Google instead of interacting with you directly.

Monitor social media reputation

You are likely to already be monitoring where your brand is being discussed on social media and then acting upon those mentions.

But this is usually viewed in the perspective of social media engagement and customer service. You need to add another objective to this task: Analyzing your site or product issues and solving them using all kinds of methods, including content.

I use Cyfe for monitoring social media mentions and scheduling social media updates. It’s very affordable and you can use multiple users to see selected dashboards, so you can delegate tasks quite efficiently with it:

Cyfe

Record your sales/customer teams interactions with clients

If you aren’t yet using a customer relationships management platform, get one now. I use Salesmate and it’s eye-opening: You can see exactly which struggles each customer had while using your site and buying your product.

Encourage your team to record as much of the customer journey as they can. Sync your social media monitoring software with Salesmate to record more of the questions and interactions with each customer.

salesmate

Add experience surveys in your “Thank you for the order” emails

Consider integrating your customer research process with your sales process by implementing surveys as part of your order status emails. This will give you a good impression as to what can be done to make the process smoother and what content needs to created to cover other needs.

You customers are your concern, so show them!

The most important person for any brand is the customer. Unfortunately our content doesn’t always reflect that.

Making a content marketing plan more customer-centric is one of the best ways we can improve our results and help turn those leads into conversions.

Three tips for a content marketing plan that makes your customers the central focus

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

In an era of constant digital distractions, how do we compete long enough to convert? The trick is to make your content as customer focused as possible.

Content marketing is a constant struggle for any brand. It is probably the most important element to their overall promotional strategy and the greatest tool at their disposal.

It can also be the most fickle, as it relies heavily on keeping and maintaining the interest of the ones consuming it.

You need to focus on your customer! This allows what you produce to immediately connect with your audience and provides something of value to them. Not only does this give you benefits in the moment by offering the information they want/need, it also gives you long-term benefits by establishing the authority of your brand.

Here are three tips and tools to help you create a customer-focused content marketing strategy.

1. Be clear on content objectives

Try to figure out just what the aims of your content will be. If there are no objectives to work from, the results will end up aimless and meandering, not really benefiting anyone, even if it manages to drive a bit of traffic. It is like throwing spaghetti at a wall… sure, some of it is going to stick, but most of it is going to end up on the floor.

So, what is it you want to achieve with each piece of content? How can you create a cohesive strategy that matches each of those objectives? How will you measure success towards those goals?

First things first: Do some keyword research and see what it is your customers want to know about. What are they struggling with? What is upsetting/confusing/angering/interesting them? How can you make their life easier through your content?

Just looking at your keyword lists won’t tell you much though. You need to work on organizing your keywords. This will help you lay out a clear content strategy.

I use spreadsheets to organize and label my keywords so that it becomes clear how to better serve the people behind using them to search.

Break keywords into groups by relevancy

This will allow you to better understand your niche and target one page to the whole group of keywords, versus each of them individually.

Keyword clustering is an effective tactic to use here. Serpstat does it pretty well by determining how many URLs overlap for different search queries and thus identifying closely related phrases. (Read more about the tactic in our dedicated guide to keyword clustering).

Serpstat clustering

From there, determine intent behind each group

Keyword intent reflects the users’ aim behind searching. It helps you to better serve your audience needs and thus improve your conversion rate. I usually label my keyword groups with four types of user intent:

  • Commercial: No need trying to serve them content here: These people are ready to buy!
  • Transitional: These people are likely to still be in the research phase but they may be willing to buy after you give them some actionable content. Product reviews and gift ideas are perfect content assets for this group
  • Navigational: Those keywords that content the brand name. Firstly, we want to make sure our brand ranks #1 for these. Secondly, we want to use these keywords to better understand possible problems with the site or the product
  • Informational: These people are searching for information only. The perfect CTA for this content is an invite to subscribe.

Label seasonal content

Last but not least, you want to make sure you publish that content when you audience needs it most. If it looks like certain content is likely to solve a seasonal problem or catch seasonal interest peak – or more often than not, both – keep it scheduled for that season.

Organize keywords

2. Go straight to the source

You need to know what is important to the people who you are targeting. Knowing your audience is always going to be the leading step before you do anything else. Yet, an astonishing number of brands fail in this regard and create not what customers really want or need, but what they assume they want or need. The difference between those two things is not so much as gap as it is a cavern.

My personal preference for doing this is through customer feedback surveys. You have to be careful using these helpful little info gathering tools because if they are too long, hard to complete or just biased it is going to annoy the customer.

I use Wyzzer to put together 60 second surveys of up to 25 questions that are fast and easy to click. They even present it a little game, so the surveys are more engaging.

It’s a nice little way to achieve several goals at a time:

  • Let your customers tell you more about themselves (What do they like? What are their life choices? What are their hobbies?)
  • Entertain your readers and engage more of them by gamifying the surveying process
  • Diversify your content by adding something new.

wyzerr

There are also several polling plugins that integrate into your WordPress blog easily. You can use these to quickly poll your customers on important matters, learn if they need a follow-up to a certain article or ask them which direction to take with your upcoming content series.

3. Map out the customer journey

Every customer goes through a journey from the moment they learn of your brand. It starts with the first lead, making them aware of your product. It ends not with the sale (as some believe), but with the experience afterward and how they feel about your brand. By the time they reach that stage they have completed the journey that you are responsible for guiding them through.

Having a clearly mapped journey with stages is one of the best things you can do. You can create content for every step, from the first landing on your website to the social reviews at the very end.

Research brand-focused keywords

I have already mentioned navigational queries and how they also should be used to better understand where your brand is lacking. Looking at how customers are searching for your brand may be eye opening?

Do they have problem finding how to log in? To they think your product is too expensive? Are they looking for alternative ways to get in touch with you?

Brand focused keywords

All of these signal of one common problem: Those people must have already visited your site but they are now searching Google instead of interacting with you directly.

Monitor social media reputation

You are likely to already be monitoring where your brand is being discussed on social media and then acting upon those mentions.

But this is usually viewed in the perspective of social media engagement and customer service. You need to add another objective to this task: Analyzing your site or product issues and solving them using all kinds of methods, including content.

I use Cyfe for monitoring social media mentions and scheduling social media updates. It’s very affordable and you can use multiple users to see selected dashboards, so you can delegate tasks quite efficiently with it:

Cyfe

Record your sales/customer teams interactions with clients

If you aren’t yet using a customer relationships management platform, get one now. I use Salesmate and it’s eye-opening: You can see exactly which struggles each customer had while using your site and buying your product.

Encourage your team to record as much of the customer journey as they can. Sync your social media monitoring software with Salesmate to record more of the questions and interactions with each customer.

salesmate

Add experience surveys in your “Thank you for the order” emails

Consider integrating your customer research process with your sales process by implementing surveys as part of your order status emails. This will give you a good impression as to what can be done to make the process smoother and what content needs to created to cover other needs.

You customers are your concern, so show them!

The most important person for any brand is the customer. Unfortunately our content doesn’t always reflect that.

Making a content marketing plan more customer-centric is one of the best ways we can improve our results and help turn those leads into conversions.

Marketing Tips for Live Streaming on Social Media

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Live streaming is one of the fastest-rising tools of the social media trade. After Twitter acquired Periscope back in 2015, it propelled live streaming at the top of the freshest social media features with thousands of users being attracted to it as both viewers and creators.

Infographic Courtesy of: Filmora.WonderShare.com

The post Marketing Tips for Live Streaming on Social Media appeared first on SiteProNews.

Marketing Tips for Live Streaming on Social Media

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Live streaming is one of the fastest-rising tools of the social media trade. After Twitter acquired Periscope back in 2015, it propelled live streaming at the top of the freshest social media features with thousands of users being attracted to it as both viewers and creators.

Infographic Courtesy of: Filmora.WonderShare.com

The post Marketing Tips for Live Streaming on Social Media appeared first on SiteProNews.

The Game-Changing SEO Guide for 2018

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

No, this is not a post about SEO predictions for 2018. This is a guide based on strategies that are already working and that will work even better throughout this year.

If you’re a regular on SiteProNews and you’ve already read some of my articles, then you must know that the SEO game is changing pretty fast. Each year, there are more than 500 changes to the Google algorithm. Sure, some of them are minor. But their combined force is enough to make us rethink our strategy at least once a year.

OK, maybe “rethink” is a pretty harsh word. Let’s go for “bettering” instead. You see, with each new algorithm change, Google tries to make its search engine friendlier to users. In other words, deliver them better, more targeted content. Which is exactly what we, marketers should also be aiming for.

SEO in 2018 – what to do to boost your ranking

If I were to summarize everything below in a single phrase, it would be authority content. Just like in academia, “publish or perish” has become the new motto. However, it’s not just about publishing any kind of content. In 2018, there will be no game-changing SEO without game-changing copywriting.

But I don’t want to spoil the surprise.

Let’s look at the most important SEO factors to consider this year.

1. RankBrain is the game master

In 2017, Google announced that they will be letting artificial intelligence run the search. And the name of the AI algorithm in charge is RankBrain.

What does RankBrain do exactly?

Glad you asked!

First of all, it learns from human users. Then, it uses that knowledge to rank websites accordingly.

Here’s a search example to make things easier. Let’s say you’re looking for the perfect margarita recipe. The first results in Google look like this:

Now, you’re hosting a big party and you want nothing less than perfect margaritas for your guests. Instinctively, you click on the first link. But you realize that the recipe is poorly written, the indications aren’t clear and you’re not too crazy about the photos, either.

It would take you about 5 seconds to spot all that.

So you ”bounce” back to the results page and you click on the third link. That one offers you not one, but seven ways to make a margarita. You can surely find your perfect recipe there, right? Of course, you hang out on this website a little longer. You compare the recipes, you choose the best one and maybe you even jot down the shopping list for your perfect margarita.

Well, RankBrain will notice all that. If more people follow the same pattern, RankBrain will conclude that the first result isn’t so good, but the third one is amazing. So it will penalize the first website and boost the ranking of the third one.

The conclusion? Authority content always wins.

2. Think about organic ranking as just that – “organic”

When we use “organic” in this context we don’t think about living organisms.

But we should.

Just like the example above illustrates, nothing is set in stone when it comes to organic rankings. The SERPs are continuously evolving.

You may be ranking in the top 10 results right now, but all it takes to demote your article to the 50th position are a few competitors with copy that’s better than yours and a few users bouncing off your pages quickly.

While there’s nothing you can do about your competitors’ writing skills, you can definitely make sure that yours are up to par. And, most importantly, you can make sure that you publish regularly. Give Google bots a chance to find something new every time they crawl your website.

3. Get conversational

The rise of voice search increases the need for a conversational tone even in written content. Assistants like Siri and Alexa are here to stay and to make life easier for their users.

A voice search user is unlikely to use non-natural, short phrases like “frappuccino”. They are more likely to use something complex and precisely targeted. Something along these lines: “Siri, how do I make a frappuccino at home?” or “Alexa, what’s the best frappuccino close to me?”

What does this mean for you?

First of all, you need to adapt your content to a more conversational tone of voice.

Next, you have no reason to shy away from long-tail keywords. Quite the opposite. They may have a lower search volume now, but this won’t last. Plus, long-tail keywords bring in more targeted traffic. This means that people who click on your link will stay longer on your page (see the first point to understand why this matters so much).

4. Long form, in-depth content wins

In the old age (read: more than 5 years ago), Google bots would crawl your website to see how many times you used a keyword in your copy. The more, the merrier and the better your ranking.

But, as we all remember, this simple strategy lead to a polluted Internet. Zero-value, keyword-stuffed content reigned supreme.

The users hated it. And Google got smarter.

Today’s RankBrain is completely different. The keyword density still matters, but not as much as you might think. The bots look at other things primarily: image ALT tags, keyword in URL, H1 tags, meta descriptions and so on.

But, most importantly, they look at context.

They know which words and phrases are typically associated with a certain keyword. So they’re looking for those.

An example: if you write about “windows”, the bots will need to find out whether your article is about the operating system or replacement windows for your home. Let’s say you’re writing about the operating system. Your copy would have to include terms like:

  • Windows 8, Windows 10 (or any reference to previous versions)
  • Bill Gates
  • Microsoft
  • Operating system
  • Office suite
  • Troubleshooting
  • Windows installation tips

This list could go on forever, but you get the point. Google needs context and you can give it through words like the ones above, which are called LSI keywords.

[I wrote an in-depth article about LSI keywords, how they can help you and how to use them here.]

You’re probably wondering what all this has to do with long-from content.

It’s quite simple: the more context you give, the better you will rank. In order to get a chance to use as many LSI keywords as possible, you need to write more than your competitors. A 300-word article would never make the cut.

Ideally, you should try to keep your posts around or above 2,000 words. Aside from giving you plenty of room for context, a greater word count also gives you a chance to cover every aspect of a topic. In turn, this will keep users on your page and lower your bounce rate.

Of course, this doesn’t mean you need to ramble on and on just to hit your target word count. Once again, being natural matters. Cover your topic in-depth, but don’t go overboard just so you write more than Wikipedia itself on a given topic.

5. Don’t ignore mobile

60% of searches on Google are done via a mobile device. That number will increase every day.

This is why Google is switching to a mobile-first index.

In a nutshell, this means that your mobile page will be considered the reference point in your ranking by Google bots. While your non-mobile optimized pages might still appear in desktop searches, you will be completely invisible to mobile ones.

Your job?

Make sure that your website is mobile-friendly, of course. Here’s how:

  • Switch to a responsive version instead of a mobile one – this ensures a seamless experience across devices.
  • Don’t hide any copy behind “Read more” buttons – Google won’t be able to see that.
  • Make sure the website is easy to use across mobile devices (even responsive websites have glitches)

Key takeaways

“The more things change, the more they stay the same.” This adage couldn’t be any truer for SEO. Yes, we are faced with tons of changes, but they all point in the same direction: better content and user friendliness.

In other words, if your readers love your content, so will Google. It’s time to get human and write for real persons instead of bots.

Thus, it is imperative that when you hire SEO copywriters you steer clear of old-school ones. Forget about keyword density for a moment and focus on context and going in-depth. Just like a bad margarita recipe, your readers can easily tell when you’re faking it i.e. when you’re just writing for rankings. Give them something useful and they will flock to your website.


avatar

Adriana Tica is an expert marketer and copywriter, with 10 years in the field, most of which were spent marketing tech companies. She is the CEO of Idunn, a digital marketing agency that helps clients all over the world with copywriting, social media marketing and marketing strategy. Follow her blog here: http://idunn.pro/blog.

The post The Game-Changing SEO Guide for 2018 appeared first on SiteProNews.

The Game-Changing SEO Guide for 2018

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

No, this is not a post about SEO predictions for 2018. This is a guide based on strategies that are already working and that will work even better throughout this year.

If you’re a regular on SiteProNews and you’ve already read some of my articles, then you must know that the SEO game is changing pretty fast. Each year, there are more than 500 changes to the Google algorithm. Sure, some of them are minor. But their combined force is enough to make us rethink our strategy at least once a year.

OK, maybe “rethink” is a pretty harsh word. Let’s go for “bettering” instead. You see, with each new algorithm change, Google tries to make its search engine friendlier to users. In other words, deliver them better, more targeted content. Which is exactly what we, marketers should also be aiming for.

SEO in 2018 – what to do to boost your ranking

If I were to summarize everything below in a single phrase, it would be authority content. Just like in academia, “publish or perish” has become the new motto. However, it’s not just about publishing any kind of content. In 2018, there will be no game-changing SEO without game-changing copywriting.

But I don’t want to spoil the surprise.

Let’s look at the most important SEO factors to consider this year.

1. RankBrain is the game master

In 2017, Google announced that they will be letting artificial intelligence run the search. And the name of the AI algorithm in charge is RankBrain.

What does RankBrain do exactly?

Glad you asked!

First of all, it learns from human users. Then, it uses that knowledge to rank websites accordingly.

Here’s a search example to make things easier. Let’s say you’re looking for the perfect margarita recipe. The first results in Google look like this:

Now, you’re hosting a big party and you want nothing less than perfect margaritas for your guests. Instinctively, you click on the first link. But you realize that the recipe is poorly written, the indications aren’t clear and you’re not too crazy about the photos, either.

It would take you about 5 seconds to spot all that.

So you ”bounce” back to the results page and you click on the third link. That one offers you not one, but seven ways to make a margarita. You can surely find your perfect recipe there, right? Of course, you hang out on this website a little longer. You compare the recipes, you choose the best one and maybe you even jot down the shopping list for your perfect margarita.

Well, RankBrain will notice all that. If more people follow the same pattern, RankBrain will conclude that the first result isn’t so good, but the third one is amazing. So it will penalize the first website and boost the ranking of the third one.

The conclusion? Authority content always wins.

2. Think about organic ranking as just that – “organic”

When we use “organic” in this context we don’t think about living organisms.

But we should.

Just like the example above illustrates, nothing is set in stone when it comes to organic rankings. The SERPs are continuously evolving.

You may be ranking in the top 10 results right now, but all it takes to demote your article to the 50th position are a few competitors with copy that’s better than yours and a few users bouncing off your pages quickly.

While there’s nothing you can do about your competitors’ writing skills, you can definitely make sure that yours are up to par. And, most importantly, you can make sure that you publish regularly. Give Google bots a chance to find something new every time they crawl your website.

3. Get conversational

The rise of voice search increases the need for a conversational tone even in written content. Assistants like Siri and Alexa are here to stay and to make life easier for their users.

A voice search user is unlikely to use non-natural, short phrases like “frappuccino”. They are more likely to use something complex and precisely targeted. Something along these lines: “Siri, how do I make a frappuccino at home?” or “Alexa, what’s the best frappuccino close to me?”

What does this mean for you?

First of all, you need to adapt your content to a more conversational tone of voice.

Next, you have no reason to shy away from long-tail keywords. Quite the opposite. They may have a lower search volume now, but this won’t last. Plus, long-tail keywords bring in more targeted traffic. This means that people who click on your link will stay longer on your page (see the first point to understand why this matters so much).

4. Long form, in-depth content wins

In the old age (read: more than 5 years ago), Google bots would crawl your website to see how many times you used a keyword in your copy. The more, the merrier and the better your ranking.

But, as we all remember, this simple strategy lead to a polluted Internet. Zero-value, keyword-stuffed content reigned supreme.

The users hated it. And Google got smarter.

Today’s RankBrain is completely different. The keyword density still matters, but not as much as you might think. The bots look at other things primarily: image ALT tags, keyword in URL, H1 tags, meta descriptions and so on.

But, most importantly, they look at context.

They know which words and phrases are typically associated with a certain keyword. So they’re looking for those.

An example: if you write about “windows”, the bots will need to find out whether your article is about the operating system or replacement windows for your home. Let’s say you’re writing about the operating system. Your copy would have to include terms like:

  • Windows 8, Windows 10 (or any reference to previous versions)
  • Bill Gates
  • Microsoft
  • Operating system
  • Office suite
  • Troubleshooting
  • Windows installation tips

This list could go on forever, but you get the point. Google needs context and you can give it through words like the ones above, which are called LSI keywords.

[I wrote an in-depth article about LSI keywords, how they can help you and how to use them here.]

You’re probably wondering what all this has to do with long-from content.

It’s quite simple: the more context you give, the better you will rank. In order to get a chance to use as many LSI keywords as possible, you need to write more than your competitors. A 300-word article would never make the cut.

Ideally, you should try to keep your posts around or above 2,000 words. Aside from giving you plenty of room for context, a greater word count also gives you a chance to cover every aspect of a topic. In turn, this will keep users on your page and lower your bounce rate.

Of course, this doesn’t mean you need to ramble on and on just to hit your target word count. Once again, being natural matters. Cover your topic in-depth, but don’t go overboard just so you write more than Wikipedia itself on a given topic.

5. Don’t ignore mobile

60% of searches on Google are done via a mobile device. That number will increase every day.

This is why Google is switching to a mobile-first index.

In a nutshell, this means that your mobile page will be considered the reference point in your ranking by Google bots. While your non-mobile optimized pages might still appear in desktop searches, you will be completely invisible to mobile ones.

Your job?

Make sure that your website is mobile-friendly, of course. Here’s how:

  • Switch to a responsive version instead of a mobile one – this ensures a seamless experience across devices.
  • Don’t hide any copy behind “Read more” buttons – Google won’t be able to see that.
  • Make sure the website is easy to use across mobile devices (even responsive websites have glitches)

Key takeaways

“The more things change, the more they stay the same.” This adage couldn’t be any truer for SEO. Yes, we are faced with tons of changes, but they all point in the same direction: better content and user friendliness.

In other words, if your readers love your content, so will Google. It’s time to get human and write for real persons instead of bots.

Thus, it is imperative that when you hire SEO copywriters you steer clear of old-school ones. Forget about keyword density for a moment and focus on context and going in-depth. Just like a bad margarita recipe, your readers can easily tell when you’re faking it i.e. when you’re just writing for rankings. Give them something useful and they will flock to your website.


avatar

Adriana Tica is an expert marketer and copywriter, with 10 years in the field, most of which were spent marketing tech companies. She is the CEO of Idunn, a digital marketing agency that helps clients all over the world with copywriting, social media marketing and marketing strategy. Follow her blog here: http://idunn.pro/blog.

The post The Game-Changing SEO Guide for 2018 appeared first on SiteProNews.

Get 2018 started with an updated multi-channel digital marketing strategy

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Did you know that 15 years ago the average consumer used two touch-points when buying an item, while consumers today run through an average of almost six touch-points?

This means that reaching new customers has become significantly more complex. With new platforms and channels still emerging, consumers have more and more choices and are demanding greater attention from brands trying to reach them.

The concept of multi-channel digital marketing has gained popularity among digital marketers over the last few years as brands and agencies have realized that one-off campaigns targeting potential customers on only one channel at a time no longer cut it.

In this article, we will examine updated multi-channel digital marketing tools and effective strategies; but before we do, let’s clarify what multi-channel marketing actually means.

What is multi-channel digital marketing?

“Multi-channel marketing is the implementation of a single strategy across multiple channels or platforms, thus maximizing opportunities to interact with prospective customers,” according to digital marketing agency Emarsys.

While as marketers we try to best predict how and where our customers might interact with us, giving them a choice — a say in the matter — leads to higher conversions. This requires casting a wide net of orchestrated touch-points and repeating your brand message across various channels, but ultimately improves your chance to raise customer awareness and let the message sink in to actually have an effect.

Let’s take a look at a handful of channels that effectively support a multitude of touch points and provide your customers with choice in selecting their preferred channel.

Social media

The advantage of social media is that it can be utilized as both introductory (initial interest) as well as retargeting channel leading a new customer further down the sales funnel.

Eyeballs through content

Facebook is a fantastic method to fill the top of your funnel with visitors.  Whether you amplify content or gain people’s attention through Facebook live or other multimedia ads, it’s crucial to think about what your target customer might be interested in and then tailor content to their desires.

This doesn’t mean that you should advertise for your product right in the article or video, but rather cover topics that might interest potential customers and ultimately lead to your product page. At the top of the funnel, the goal is to create that first touchpoint which will enable you to start marketing to them through other channels, particularly email and remarketing.

Generating leads

Another helpful Facebook tool comes in handy at this stage of the sales funnel, especially if you run an ecommerce business — it’s called Dynamic Product Ads. These ads “automatically promote products to people who have expressed interest on your website, in your app or elsewhere on the internet,” according to Facebook.

You can even upload your product catalog to Facebook and after setting up the campaign, the social network will handle the rest (such as matching people with the right product).

Email

While social media is very effective as both introductory and retargeting channel, emails are most effective when retargeting potential customers.

Chances are that by the time someone has provided their e-mail address, you have some idea of what they are interested in and looking for, thanks to your “eyeballs through content” campaign as discussed above. So crafting effective e-mails addressing their potential pain points should be a little easier now.

Crucial to making e-mail marketing successful is to make sure its content aligns with your overall campaign message. A recent case study confirmed that “Coordinating messaging across channels resulted in reaching customers who were 22% more likely to purchase than those only reached by email.”

AdWords

You can craft AdWords campaigns to function at the top, middle, and bottom of the funnel.  At the top, you can create broad match modified campaigns focusing on identifying exactly what keywords people search for in your space.

As part of your exploratory campaigns, you can also look for lateral keywords of interest that can help you understand exactly what your audience is looking for.

At the middle of the funnel, you have people who are interested in the products or services you are offering so you serve them the most targeted ads.  Traditional AdWords campaigns tend to belong to this stage of the funnel.  At the bottom of the funnel, you can use AdWords remarketing to continue creating additional touchpoints after consumers have visited your site.

Smart marketers use AdWords Ad Extensions to include interactive and clickable information right on top of the ad, such as coupons, phone numbers, and text message extensions. Making these marketing tools available right inside the ad can cut down significantly on the number of steps in your sales funnel.

By clicking on the coupon, for example, customers could be enticed to walk right into a physical location to pick up the product they are getting a discount on. Clicking on the phone number or text extension, on the other hand, could connect them directly to customer service, who in turn can answer any remaining questions and, thus, increase purchase intent.

SMS/Text messaging

Speaking of text messages: retargeting potential customers is not restricted to e-mails and Google AdWords. Text messaging (SMS) is another way — and an increasingly popular one — to lead consumers further down the sales funnel.

Let’s say your Facebook or Twitter ad asked potential new customers to “opt-in,” which they did using their social media accounts. Most social networks now require mobile phone numbers when users first sign up. This information will be available to you as well if you are setting up ads through these social networks.

You now have the opportunity to text your lead and interact with them on a channel that has so far not been saturated by marketers. It also provides a much more intimate environment, which could help build trust.

You can easily set up text message campaigns with tools like Autopilot and TextMagic; and you should, too, because text message opens are as high as 99% among mobile users. Key is to let potential leads opt in voluntarily as opposed to being contacted via text out of the blue. Also, a good next step might be asking for permission to set up a phone call to continue the conversation.

Text messages can also be useful when sending out reminders for live events or webinars, which some of your new customers might have signed up for, but are about to miss because they forgot putting it in their calendars.

Putting it all together

As you can see, none of the marketing tools listed above are particularly effective in this day and age if you keep them isolated. Google AdWords can lead to customer service conversions; social media can lead to email and text message opt-ins; email in turn can be reinforced by text messages, which could lead back to customer service.

That’s why a consistent brand message as well as consistent quality of content, service, and customer experience across all channels is essential. Future customers should get a sense of familiarity at every turn of the sales funnel if you are to build a trustworthy relationship with them.

Coordinating this rather significant number of communication channels seems like a daunting and expensive task; but don’t worry, even with a low budget you can implement these multi-channel marketing strategies.

One final thought: all the marketing in the world is for naught if you do not measure and analyze key data. This includes customer profile characteristics (like demographics and psychographics) and customer behavior to narrow down your target audience.

In addition to this data, keeping track of conversion rates between the various platforms will help you measure success and create a continuously more effective multi-channel digital marketing strategy.