The silent killers of loading time and how to fix them

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Imagine visiting a website that takes more than 10, no two seconds to load. We know that the mouse is going to hover to the top right corner because honestly, no one has the time to wait nowadays. 

A Forbes article mentioned that a mere one-second delay in page load time means a seven percent decline in sales, 11% fewer page views, a 16% decrease in customer satisfaction, and a seven percent loss in conversions. 

Your website may be a work of art with awesome features. It can have lightning speed chat responses but with slow loading time, none of that matters. 

Attention spans are growing smaller and patience is thinner than ever. Other than that, slow loading sites impact your SEO because it affects how Google sees your page. Speed is a ranking factor Google uses to measure your page. Sure, content may be king, but speed can change how your content performs in search. 

We’ll dig deep and find the silent killers of loading time – both common and uncommon causes.

1. Uncompressed images and bizarre image dimensions

The quality and size of an image affects its loading time. Having a high-resolution image on every page means your site will load slower.

How you can fix this

A couple of ways we found included installing plugins. The first one is with a jQuery Lazy Load plugin. This plugin allows the images that are only appearing to load “above the fold” or on a part a visitor is currently viewing. 

The second option is by using image optimizers such as Yahoo!’s Smush.it or use the WP Smush.it plugin which compacts images without altering their quality. With the WP plugin, it can be done automatically when you add graphics to your site.

2. Unnecessary plugins

If you have a WordPress site you’ll know that there are tons of plugins wandering around and sometimes you might feel the need to download every one because they’re “helpful” to your site. 

Before you know it, you’ll have plugins running your site and you might even have a plugin for your plugin.

Plugin overload can be a problem because the more plugins your site has, the more work it has to do when it loads. Also, not all plugins are as awesome as they claim to be. Beware of outdated plugins that can slow down your site instead of improving its performance.

What you can do to solve this problem is by evaluating your current plugins to figure out which ones you actually need. You might have multiple plugins that have the same function or have some that you’re no longer using. 

When you’re deleting plugins check to see if

– The plugin is relevant and updated

– Whether it has another similar plugin with same functions

– Whether you’re still using it the respective plugin

You can also check the performance of your plugins using the P3 (Plugin Performance Profiler) which shows you the impact of each plugin has on your WordPress site load time.

3. An excessive homepage

Your homepage is the face of your brand. So, we get it if you want it to look the best. However, when you try to impress new visitors with a bunch of widgets, content, and state-of-the-art imagery, it’s going to compromise your loading time.

When you want to make an impressive site, keep in mind that a clean design can do wonders. We’re not telling you to ban widgets completely (save them for the end of your blog posts or site pages) but we’re just telling you to keep it simple.

Another thing you can do to speed up load times is by altering the WordPress options to show excerpts instead of full posts and limiting the posts per page by five to seven each.

4. Free third-party WordPress themes

Free WordPress themes may sound like the best thing since sliced bread but free things come with a price tag. When you’re looking for a theme on WordPress, you’re likely to click on those free ones made by a third-party. They’re free anyway, so what can go wrong? Right?

Apparently, a lot of things. Like how free music and movies can come with spyware or malware, free third-party WordPress themes may be one of the causes for your slow website.

How you can fix this

One of the best ways is to only use themes from the official WordPress theme repository. If you want something more personalized, consider allocating less than $100 in a premium theme you can customize to your heart’s desire.

5. Unreliable web hosting

Having a web hosting server that’s not properly configured can harm your loading times. When picking a web hosting server, more often than not, we’ll try to choose the most budget-friendly option. That may be good in the beginning when you’re just starting out. 

However, once the amount of traffic you’re receiving suddenly spikes, your host and server won’t be able to handle a huge amount of users at a single time. Sudden spikes can happen especially during times you launch a new online marketing campaign or a new product. 

Instead of looking for a free or cheap web hosting solution, it’s best to use a well-known host that usually runs between four to eight dollars a month, which isn’t so bad. 

Other than the price, you should also keep in mind how fast the server responds when it deals with problems. Sometimes your site can have emergencies and filling in forms just won’t cut it. Do your research thoroughly and read reviews about the company and its support. 

6. Invisible loading images or videos

When you’re scrolling through a page, there is some content you can’t see immediately. Some are still at the bottom of the page and are visible after a visitor arrives at the exact spot. 

So, how is this a problem? The more images you tell your server to fetch, the slower your site will load. The reality is, the server usually fetches all of these images and videos (even the ones you can’t see yet). This is a huge factor for mobile devices since they have limited speed and data.

This can be fixed with “lazy loading” which means fetching the file only if it’s needed and only when it’s on the screen. A couple of plugins you can use for your WordPress site are BJ Lazy Load and LazyLoad. 

7. Coding issue

Your website is made of code. The more elaborate your site is, the more coding is necessary. Just because you want your website to be ideal, that doesn’t mean the coding should be over the top. Irrelevant or unnecessary code will only slow down your site since the server has to work through more data in order to get to a page.

An example of a coding issue

Unnecessary redirects which happen when the code refers to two different forms of the website URL. Although this seems like something trivial, it makes a huge difference.

When a redirect takes place, a user has to wait for the page to load twice. Using too many redirects means you’re doubling the load time.

To fix this, you need to review your code in detail. Most of the time, the root cause of slow load times could be from a coding issue. This occurs when the code isn’t consistent and causes too many redirects.

8. Not using a content delivery network (CDN)

CDN is a network of independent servers deployed in different geographic locations that serves web content to visitors. Depending on the location of your website visitors, the content requested gets served by the node that’s at the nearest data center. 

The problem with not using a CDN is that many sites can be slow, especially if they have visitors from around the world. Although a CDN isn’t necessary, it can help serve your web content much faster and reduce the loading time.

Now that you’re aware of some of the most and least obvious loading time killers, it’s time to get cracking with fixing them for your website.

Got some more load time killers that you wish to add to this list? Share them in the comments.

Nat McNeely is Digital Marketing Manager of Breadnbeyond, an award-winning explainer video company. 

The post The silent killers of loading time and how to fix them appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Could Your Business Survive a Cyberattack?

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

The way we work is changing, with more businesses adopting online-only models and remote working every day. However, while these new practices offer new opportunities, they also provide additional vectors for attack. Given that cybercrime is on the rise, and that almost 60% of cyberattacks target small businesses, this is a problem that we can no longer afford to ignore. Below, we’ll outline a few simple ways you can test your company’s vulnerability and improve its resilience to cyberattacks. 

Remove unnecessary clutter

If you’ve had your computers for any length of time, they likely have applications installed that aren’t strictly necessary for work. Perhaps you have a few games installed or a couple of drivers for a device you no longer use? 

The problem is that every single piece of software you install, whether it’s freeware or a well-known application, has its own dependencies and vulnerabilities. In other words, every unnecessary program you have is another potential weak point for an attacker to exploit. 

The good news is that these days, most of the things you need for work can be accessed in a browser. For instance, you can create documents, listen to music, and send emails without needing any dedicated applications. Simply: the fewer programs you have, the less risk there is.

Harden your infrastructure

Now that you’ve closed as many doors as possible to a potential hacker, it’s time to block the remaining ways in. One of the most important things to do is install a Web Application Firewall (WAF) on your company servers. This prevents some of the most common threats outright, including Cross-Site Scripting and cookie poisoning attacks. 

We also recommend using a company Virtual Private Network (VPN) whenever possible, as well as separate email encryption. The VPN not only prevents attackers from observing your employee’s internet traffic (which includes login credentials, contact lists, and internal communications), but it also nullifies most kinds of Man-in-the-Middle attacks. 

Meanwhile, the email encryption stops spear-phishing attacks by guaranteeing that the person you’re talking to is who they claim to be. 

Plan for the worst-case scenario

If something goes wrong, it’s vital that you’re able to find out what happened as quickly as possible. This is where proper monitoring procedure comes in. Your IT staff can use applications like NetCrunch or Spiceworks to find out all kinds of information about the network in real-time. For example, you could set up an automated alert letting your team know about multiple failed login attempts or new changes to user rights. 

Further, it’s important to consider the risk of a breach when designing your systems. This sounds obvious, but even major companies neglect this (Sony infamously stored thousands of user passwords in plaintext). We cannot stress this enough: user details should always be salted, hashed, and encrypted to ensure that even if the data is stolen, it cannot be read. 

Introduce an internet usage policy

It’s often easy to forget that not everyone is a computer expert. As such, it pays to implement a commonsense internet usage policy. This doesn’t have to be overly restrictive; generally, a simple web-filter, an ad-blocker, and limited application installation rights should protect you from most problems. 

We’d also recommend creating disk images of your machine periodically so that you can just roll back to a fresh installation should a rogue piece of malware slip through. 

Don’t neglect system maintenance

Unfortunately, even the best systems need regular maintenance. New software vulnerabilities are discovered on a daily basis and if these aren’t addressed, they can pose a major threat to your network’s security. Take Heartbleed, for instance: this server bug allowed hackers to view encrypted web traffic and five years later, there are still 200,000 vulnerable devices. 

Passwords should also be changed every few months at least to prevent attackers or former employees from logging in with old credentials. A good rule of thumb is that a password should be at least eight characters long, with mixed-case letters, numbers, and punctuation. 

Ideally, your system would reject dangerously simple passwords like “qwerty” and prevent staff from reverting to a previously-used password. 

Simply put, business owners are caught in a game of cat-and-mouse with cybercriminals. The odds are in your favor, though, as attackers have to try increasingly hard to find cracks in your network’s defenses. In contrast, all you have to do is minimize risk, and the steps above are an excellent way to start.


avatar

Ian Garland is a tech writer, programmer, and author with a particular interest in
digital privacy.

The post Could Your Business Survive a Cyberattack? appeared first on SiteProNews.

Could Your Business Survive a Cyberattack?

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

The way we work is changing, with more businesses adopting online-only models and remote working every day. However, while these new practices offer new opportunities, they also provide additional vectors for attack. Given that cybercrime is on the rise, and that almost 60% of cyberattacks target small businesses, this is a problem that we can no longer afford to ignore. Below, we’ll outline a few simple ways you can test your company’s vulnerability and improve its resilience to cyberattacks. 

Remove unnecessary clutter

If you’ve had your computers for any length of time, they likely have applications installed that aren’t strictly necessary for work. Perhaps you have a few games installed or a couple of drivers for a device you no longer use? 

The problem is that every single piece of software you install, whether it’s freeware or a well-known application, has its own dependencies and vulnerabilities. In other words, every unnecessary program you have is another potential weak point for an attacker to exploit. 

The good news is that these days, most of the things you need for work can be accessed in a browser. For instance, you can create documents, listen to music, and send emails without needing any dedicated applications. Simply: the fewer programs you have, the less risk there is.

Harden your infrastructure

Now that you’ve closed as many doors as possible to a potential hacker, it’s time to block the remaining ways in. One of the most important things to do is install a Web Application Firewall (WAF) on your company servers. This prevents some of the most common threats outright, including Cross-Site Scripting and cookie poisoning attacks. 

We also recommend using a company Virtual Private Network (VPN) whenever possible, as well as separate email encryption. The VPN not only prevents attackers from observing your employee’s internet traffic (which includes login credentials, contact lists, and internal communications), but it also nullifies most kinds of Man-in-the-Middle attacks. 

Meanwhile, the email encryption stops spear-phishing attacks by guaranteeing that the person you’re talking to is who they claim to be. 

Plan for the worst-case scenario

If something goes wrong, it’s vital that you’re able to find out what happened as quickly as possible. This is where proper monitoring procedure comes in. Your IT staff can use applications like NetCrunch or Spiceworks to find out all kinds of information about the network in real-time. For example, you could set up an automated alert letting your team know about multiple failed login attempts or new changes to user rights. 

Further, it’s important to consider the risk of a breach when designing your systems. This sounds obvious, but even major companies neglect this (Sony infamously stored thousands of user passwords in plaintext). We cannot stress this enough: user details should always be salted, hashed, and encrypted to ensure that even if the data is stolen, it cannot be read. 

Introduce an internet usage policy

It’s often easy to forget that not everyone is a computer expert. As such, it pays to implement a commonsense internet usage policy. This doesn’t have to be overly restrictive; generally, a simple web-filter, an ad-blocker, and limited application installation rights should protect you from most problems. 

We’d also recommend creating disk images of your machine periodically so that you can just roll back to a fresh installation should a rogue piece of malware slip through. 

Don’t neglect system maintenance

Unfortunately, even the best systems need regular maintenance. New software vulnerabilities are discovered on a daily basis and if these aren’t addressed, they can pose a major threat to your network’s security. Take Heartbleed, for instance: this server bug allowed hackers to view encrypted web traffic and five years later, there are still 200,000 vulnerable devices. 

Passwords should also be changed every few months at least to prevent attackers or former employees from logging in with old credentials. A good rule of thumb is that a password should be at least eight characters long, with mixed-case letters, numbers, and punctuation. 

Ideally, your system would reject dangerously simple passwords like “qwerty” and prevent staff from reverting to a previously-used password. 

Simply put, business owners are caught in a game of cat-and-mouse with cybercriminals. The odds are in your favor, though, as attackers have to try increasingly hard to find cracks in your network’s defenses. In contrast, all you have to do is minimize risk, and the steps above are an excellent way to start.


avatar

Ian Garland is a tech writer, programmer, and author with a particular interest in
digital privacy.

The post Could Your Business Survive a Cyberattack? appeared first on SiteProNews.

Biometric Verification Trends – Evolving Use Cases

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Biometric verification, including face recognition, iris scan, fingerprints, and palm recognition is being widely used in the corporate sector for security and ID verification purposes. The booming usage of facial recognition technology is streamlining the identity verification process and it is also more accurate than other forms of biometrics. A survey shows that 67% of people are comfortable with biometric verification which is expected to increase in the coming years. If on one side, biometric authentication is introducing high-level security, on the other side, it is convenient for the public to authenticate themselves without spending a huge amount of time on manual verification processes. Biometric verification is being widely used in different sectors to mitigate the risk of fraudulent activities. 

Also, business productivity increases because work is done in less time. Global biometric system market revenue was 21.8 billion USD in 2018. It is expected to grow even more in the course of the next few years. All types of businesses and organizations are utilizing biometrics for an array of operations. There are many use cases of biometrics, but a few of them have gained acclaim in various industries.  A few of these use cases are biometric identity verification, fraud prevention, digital signups, online access, law enforcement, etc. 

The following are some use cases of biometric verification technology:

Travel Industry

In the travel industry, biometric verification solutions are helping in identifying travelers. Facial verification techniques are used in the US at various border crossings.

Also, at airports for international flights, some countries apply strict rules regarding biometric verification of passengers. Biometrics provide reliable security measures in the travel industry and speed up the passenger authentication process by shortening queues and waiting time.

Ride-Sharing App

Uber has long been facing security issues and has now deployed facial verification technology to authenticate the partner driver at the time of registration. This has decreased security risks because face verification technology is hard to fool.  

Digital ID Cards 

A large number of countries have implemented a high level of security by introducing digital ID cards for citizens. These ID cards contain electronic information of citizen biometrics, images and other data. This information is stored in ID cards in a way that makes it easy for machines to read. 

Also, criminals and identity thieves find it far more difficult to copy and duplicate ID cards. This results in mitigating the risks of ID card fraud and avoids security issues related to it.

Education Sector

Biometric verification is used to authenticate students at colleges and also to mark their attendance in classrooms. It allows only authentic persons to enter school/college premises, providing a secure environment. Face verification technology is also being used in classrooms for student behavior analysis, based on their facial expressions at any point during a lecture. This helps educators to understand where students are having difficulties and is also helpful in enhancing teacher lecture strategies.

Online marketplace

In an online marketplace, customer identity verification is ensured using biometric techniques. These techniques mostly include facial recognition technology. A person is asked to capture a live picture and upload it, this picture is verified against the picture on the ID card. If both match, the customer is verified, otherwise his request is rejected. This advancement in the online marketplace has resulted in the reduction of online fraud and payment scams. Businesses using biometric techniques not only include e-commerce stores, but also online banks and other online payment portals.


avatar

Technical Content writing is my passion. I have broad experience in writing for the technical field. I started my writing at the age of sixteen when I was in college. Now I’m already writing for contribution sites as an independent influencer. I wrote many articles on medium and many of them are published in various publications. I wrote many case studies for businesses to let them know the real need for digital transformation for their business. Nowadays am writing about Facial Recognition and AML(Anti Money Laundering).


The post Biometric Verification Trends – Evolving Use Cases appeared first on SiteProNews.

Biometric Verification Trends – Evolving Use Cases

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Biometric verification, including face recognition, iris scan, fingerprints, and palm recognition is being widely used in the corporate sector for security and ID verification purposes. The booming usage of facial recognition technology is streamlining the identity verification process and it is also more accurate than other forms of biometrics. A survey shows that 67% of people are comfortable with biometric verification which is expected to increase in the coming years. If on one side, biometric authentication is introducing high-level security, on the other side, it is convenient for the public to authenticate themselves without spending a huge amount of time on manual verification processes. Biometric verification is being widely used in different sectors to mitigate the risk of fraudulent activities. 

Also, business productivity increases because work is done in less time. Global biometric system market revenue was 21.8 billion USD in 2018. It is expected to grow even more in the course of the next few years. All types of businesses and organizations are utilizing biometrics for an array of operations. There are many use cases of biometrics, but a few of them have gained acclaim in various industries.  A few of these use cases are biometric identity verification, fraud prevention, digital signups, online access, law enforcement, etc. 

The following are some use cases of biometric verification technology:

Travel Industry

In the travel industry, biometric verification solutions are helping in identifying travelers. Facial verification techniques are used in the US at various border crossings.

Also, at airports for international flights, some countries apply strict rules regarding biometric verification of passengers. Biometrics provide reliable security measures in the travel industry and speed up the passenger authentication process by shortening queues and waiting time.

Ride-Sharing App

Uber has long been facing security issues and has now deployed facial verification technology to authenticate the partner driver at the time of registration. This has decreased security risks because face verification technology is hard to fool.  

Digital ID Cards 

A large number of countries have implemented a high level of security by introducing digital ID cards for citizens. These ID cards contain electronic information of citizen biometrics, images and other data. This information is stored in ID cards in a way that makes it easy for machines to read. 

Also, criminals and identity thieves find it far more difficult to copy and duplicate ID cards. This results in mitigating the risks of ID card fraud and avoids security issues related to it.

Education Sector

Biometric verification is used to authenticate students at colleges and also to mark their attendance in classrooms. It allows only authentic persons to enter school/college premises, providing a secure environment. Face verification technology is also being used in classrooms for student behavior analysis, based on their facial expressions at any point during a lecture. This helps educators to understand where students are having difficulties and is also helpful in enhancing teacher lecture strategies.

Online marketplace

In an online marketplace, customer identity verification is ensured using biometric techniques. These techniques mostly include facial recognition technology. A person is asked to capture a live picture and upload it, this picture is verified against the picture on the ID card. If both match, the customer is verified, otherwise his request is rejected. This advancement in the online marketplace has resulted in the reduction of online fraud and payment scams. Businesses using biometric techniques not only include e-commerce stores, but also online banks and other online payment portals.


avatar

Technical Content writing is my passion. I have broad experience in writing for the technical field. I started my writing at the age of sixteen when I was in college. Now I’m already writing for contribution sites as an independent influencer. I wrote many articles on medium and many of them are published in various publications. I wrote many case studies for businesses to let them know the real need for digital transformation for their business. Nowadays am writing about Facial Recognition and AML(Anti Money Laundering).


The post Biometric Verification Trends – Evolving Use Cases appeared first on SiteProNews.

How to Build a New Employee Onboarding Process

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

The first impression is the best and lasting impression. This adage is so apt when it comes to onboarding new hires. A strong onboarding process can make your new hires feel welcome, excited about the opportunity and make them feel more attuned to organizational goals.

Contrary to popular belief, employee onboarding is not a single day orientation event or handing out of new goodies. It is more of a strategy that helps attract and retain talent. It is the inflexion point from where the employee stops being an interested stranger to the organization and becomes an active stakeholder in its growth. 

That brings us to the question of how to build a new employee onboarding process? 

Here is how you can create a perfect onboarding process right from the first meet with the new hire. 

One to two weeks before the employee onboarding day

One to two weeks before the onboarding day is the right time to inform the new recruit about the physical address of the office, directions to reach there and modes of transport available. Giving this information beforehand will make it easier for the candidate to make arrangements for transport and accommodation.

If the recruit is relocating to the business location from another State or country, the intimation should be given as soon as the offer letter is given. Do everything possible to make the relocation and transportation easier for the recruit. If possible, assign a specific person from the recruitment team who can be reached for help when needed. The assistance of the travel desk should be offered to smoothen the onboarding process. 

The day before the onboarding process

Send the recruit a welcome letter and information about how to pass through the security systems. Most offices which are located in business centres have tight security processes that do not allow entry to strangers. Your new recruits might be well known to you, but the security team must also be informed of their upcoming arrival. Sending a security clearance letter that the new hire can show at the security gate should be serving that purpose. 

On the onboarding day

Make sure that there is someone physically present to welcome and to show the new hire around the office. Ideally, their cubicle or cabin should be kept ready complete with nameplate. 

The onboarding process must also be well-planned to ensure that the reporting manager and the team find the time to meet and greet the new recruit. 

Other things that should be given to the new recruit on the onboarding day include:

  • The work laptop, office stationery, goodies like backpacks, notebooks, coffee mug, etc.
  • Official email id, work phone, employee ID as per the HR system, etc.
  • Induction manuals that explain the business, its current operations, and a brief introduction about other departments.
  • Identity card, access keys to their desk drawers, parking stickers, meal coupons, etc.

During the first week of employee onboarding

The onboarding process does not end with a single day. There is a lot of paperwork that needs to be done to ensure that the new recruit is completely absorbed into the organization’s system. This involves paperwork related to the IRS, pension schemes, health insurance, background checks and so on. 

The new recruit should also be instructed well in advance to be prepared with copies of educational accomplishment, work experience, personal identification documents and so on. This will make the onboarding process easier and quicker. 

The first week of the onboarding process is also the time when one-to-one meetings with reporting managers, other departmental managers as well as team leads should be scheduled. 

During the rest of the period

For a new recruit, getting into the organization’s system is not an easy task. It could take them as long as three months to go from new recruit to part of the system. So, it is essential that the employee onboarding process has a long-term plan in place that will slowly, but steadily bring the employee into the system. 

From the first day of onboarding through the first three months, a new hire requires much support from the onboarding team. Ensure that a 30-day check is kept to ensure that everything is in place in terms of paperwork, organizational roles and so on. Even trivial matters like the comfort of the workspace, workplace accessibility issues, etc. should be addressed immediately. Do ask for feedback about the onboarding process so that any flaws therein can be rectified while onboarding employees in the future.

Conclusion

Planning an employee onboarding process requires proactive planning and coordination. The ultimate payoff of having a good employee onboarding process in place is that it inducts the employee into the organizational culture and topography quickly. It also contributes to employee wellness as it relates to paperwork, understanding organizational goals, individual roles and responsibilities and so on. 

How great can your onboarding process be? It depends on how great you want your new hires to feel. If you want them to feel top of the world and all geared up to deliver their very best, don’t hold back on anything. 


avatar

Jayakumar Muthusamy is a Digital marketer at Freshworks Inc. His expertise lies in SEO and non-paid lead gen. He takes care of a Freshtem a free applicant tracking system.

The post How to Build a New Employee Onboarding Process appeared first on SiteProNews.

How to Build a New Employee Onboarding Process

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

The first impression is the best and lasting impression. This adage is so apt when it comes to onboarding new hires. A strong onboarding process can make your new hires feel welcome, excited about the opportunity and make them feel more attuned to organizational goals.

Contrary to popular belief, employee onboarding is not a single day orientation event or handing out of new goodies. It is more of a strategy that helps attract and retain talent. It is the inflexion point from where the employee stops being an interested stranger to the organization and becomes an active stakeholder in its growth. 

That brings us to the question of how to build a new employee onboarding process? 

Here is how you can create a perfect onboarding process right from the first meet with the new hire. 

One to two weeks before the employee onboarding day

One to two weeks before the onboarding day is the right time to inform the new recruit about the physical address of the office, directions to reach there and modes of transport available. Giving this information beforehand will make it easier for the candidate to make arrangements for transport and accommodation.

If the recruit is relocating to the business location from another State or country, the intimation should be given as soon as the offer letter is given. Do everything possible to make the relocation and transportation easier for the recruit. If possible, assign a specific person from the recruitment team who can be reached for help when needed. The assistance of the travel desk should be offered to smoothen the onboarding process. 

The day before the onboarding process

Send the recruit a welcome letter and information about how to pass through the security systems. Most offices which are located in business centres have tight security processes that do not allow entry to strangers. Your new recruits might be well known to you, but the security team must also be informed of their upcoming arrival. Sending a security clearance letter that the new hire can show at the security gate should be serving that purpose. 

On the onboarding day

Make sure that there is someone physically present to welcome and to show the new hire around the office. Ideally, their cubicle or cabin should be kept ready complete with nameplate. 

The onboarding process must also be well-planned to ensure that the reporting manager and the team find the time to meet and greet the new recruit. 

Other things that should be given to the new recruit on the onboarding day include:

  • The work laptop, office stationery, goodies like backpacks, notebooks, coffee mug, etc.
  • Official email id, work phone, employee ID as per the HR system, etc.
  • Induction manuals that explain the business, its current operations, and a brief introduction about other departments.
  • Identity card, access keys to their desk drawers, parking stickers, meal coupons, etc.

During the first week of employee onboarding

The onboarding process does not end with a single day. There is a lot of paperwork that needs to be done to ensure that the new recruit is completely absorbed into the organization’s system. This involves paperwork related to the IRS, pension schemes, health insurance, background checks and so on. 

The new recruit should also be instructed well in advance to be prepared with copies of educational accomplishment, work experience, personal identification documents and so on. This will make the onboarding process easier and quicker. 

The first week of the onboarding process is also the time when one-to-one meetings with reporting managers, other departmental managers as well as team leads should be scheduled. 

During the rest of the period

For a new recruit, getting into the organization’s system is not an easy task. It could take them as long as three months to go from new recruit to part of the system. So, it is essential that the employee onboarding process has a long-term plan in place that will slowly, but steadily bring the employee into the system. 

From the first day of onboarding through the first three months, a new hire requires much support from the onboarding team. Ensure that a 30-day check is kept to ensure that everything is in place in terms of paperwork, organizational roles and so on. Even trivial matters like the comfort of the workspace, workplace accessibility issues, etc. should be addressed immediately. Do ask for feedback about the onboarding process so that any flaws therein can be rectified while onboarding employees in the future.

Conclusion

Planning an employee onboarding process requires proactive planning and coordination. The ultimate payoff of having a good employee onboarding process in place is that it inducts the employee into the organizational culture and topography quickly. It also contributes to employee wellness as it relates to paperwork, understanding organizational goals, individual roles and responsibilities and so on. 

How great can your onboarding process be? It depends on how great you want your new hires to feel. If you want them to feel top of the world and all geared up to deliver their very best, don’t hold back on anything. 


avatar

Jayakumar Muthusamy is a Digital marketer at Freshworks Inc. His expertise lies in SEO and non-paid lead gen. He takes care of a Freshtem a free applicant tracking system.

The post How to Build a New Employee Onboarding Process appeared first on SiteProNews.