Google Analytics Tool Helps Businesses Track Customer Behavior, Appraise Own Performance – Goals Receives Substantial Update

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google wants to help business owners measure their goals.

A recent upgrade of Goals in Google Analytics makes it easier for business owners to measure customer behavior as well as assess their own performances.

“Sales are just one possible goal—there are many other important interactions that may be valuable to your business, such as media plays, social connections, newsletter sign-ups, a minimum purchase value, or the amount of time spent on a screen,” Google Analytics product manager Stefan F. Schnabl wrote in a blog post.  “Using Goals, you can measure these types of engagement activities and track how these interactions help you to meet your larger business objectives.”

Live now in Goals in Google Analytics are a new set-up flow, new templates and new verification capabilities.

Here is how to get started:

• Goals are set at the profile level in Google Analytics accounts. To find a profile, click the Admin tab and then go to the account, property, and profile you want.

• Click Goals, then create a Goal.

• Follow the flow to set up and start measuring your Goals.

• For help setting up Goals, visit Google’s help center.

Google image

Google image

New templates

Both redesigned and new templates are available in the Goals set-up flow so users can quickly add important and “actionable” Goals to their Analytics account.

“When you use a template, the Goal setup flow is pre-filled with suggested values (based on your industry) that you can either keep or change as you walk through the process,” Schnabl said. The templates are organized into four business objectives (revenue, acquisition, inquiry, engagement) to help you think about the purpose of each Goal, plus you can still create custom goals.”

Schnabl said “revenue” goals don’t have to be a direct sale, but any user activity that has a significant impact on the owner’s business, such as a potential customer scheduling an appointment.

Schnabl also recommends business owners make sure they are using the template best suited for their companies. To choose or change templates, go to property settings to “choose the one that best describes your business.”

Verify Goals
A verify option exists at the end of the setup flow to enable users to see what the conversion rate would have been for the past seven days had a particular Goal been setup.

“Using the verify option gives you immediate feedback, so you can decide to save or modify the Goal configuration you’re working on,” he said.

Analyze Goals performance

The Goals Overview report, located under the Conversions section, allows users to see how their goal completions happen over time. Use the metric selector in the Goals Overview report to choose the relevant metric.

“Develop a sense how often a Goal conversion happens, and look to identify relationships between different Goals,” Schnabl said.

Schnabl gave some examples of how to analyze different goals:

• Select a single Goal and observe the performance over time. Use the date range selector and compare the Goal performance month on month, or quarter on quarter. This way you can compare seasonal trends, and the growth rate of your goal over time.

Google image

Google image

Selecting two Goal completion metrics next to each other will allow you to see correlational effects over time. A Goal measuring site engagement, like a media interaction, or a social share, could be indicative of a rise in sales.

Google image

Google image

“Ultimately, understanding how your users interact with your site allows you to make important decisions about site content and effective use of your marketing and advertising resources,” Schnabl said.

He also suggested perusing the reports in Multi-Channel Funnels which focus on visitors’ “entire path to conversion.” This even includes the various  off-site interactions they had prior to making a purchase.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Google Analytics Tool Helps Businesses Track Customer Behavior, Appraise Own Performance

Google Analytics Tool Helps Businesses Track Customer Behavior, Appraise Own Performance – Goals Receives Substantial Update

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google wants to help business owners measure their goals.

A recent upgrade of Goals in Google Analytics makes it easier for business owners to measure customer behavior as well as assess their own performances.

“Sales are just one possible goal—there are many other important interactions that may be valuable to your business, such as media plays, social connections, newsletter sign-ups, a minimum purchase value, or the amount of time spent on a screen,” Google Analytics product manager Stefan F. Schnabl wrote in a blog post.  “Using Goals, you can measure these types of engagement activities and track how these interactions help you to meet your larger business objectives.”

Live now in Goals in Google Analytics are a new set-up flow, new templates and new verification capabilities.

Here is how to get started:

• Goals are set at the profile level in Google Analytics accounts. To find a profile, click the Admin tab and then go to the account, property, and profile you want.

• Click Goals, then create a Goal.

• Follow the flow to set up and start measuring your Goals.

• For help setting up Goals, visit Google’s help center.

Google image

Google image

New templates

Both redesigned and new templates are available in the Goals set-up flow so users can quickly add important and “actionable” Goals to their Analytics account.

“When you use a template, the Goal setup flow is pre-filled with suggested values (based on your industry) that you can either keep or change as you walk through the process,” Schnabl said. The templates are organized into four business objectives (revenue, acquisition, inquiry, engagement) to help you think about the purpose of each Goal, plus you can still create custom goals.”

Schnabl said “revenue” goals don’t have to be a direct sale, but any user activity that has a significant impact on the owner’s business, such as a potential customer scheduling an appointment.

Schnabl also recommends business owners make sure they are using the template best suited for their companies. To choose or change templates, go to property settings to “choose the one that best describes your business.”

Verify Goals
A verify option exists at the end of the setup flow to enable users to see what the conversion rate would have been for the past seven days had a particular Goal been setup.

“Using the verify option gives you immediate feedback, so you can decide to save or modify the Goal configuration you’re working on,” he said.

Analyze Goals performance

The Goals Overview report, located under the Conversions section, allows users to see how their goal completions happen over time. Use the metric selector in the Goals Overview report to choose the relevant metric.

“Develop a sense how often a Goal conversion happens, and look to identify relationships between different Goals,” Schnabl said.

Schnabl gave some examples of how to analyze different goals:

• Select a single Goal and observe the performance over time. Use the date range selector and compare the Goal performance month on month, or quarter on quarter. This way you can compare seasonal trends, and the growth rate of your goal over time.

Google image

Google image

Selecting two Goal completion metrics next to each other will allow you to see correlational effects over time. A Goal measuring site engagement, like a media interaction, or a social share, could be indicative of a rise in sales.

Google image

Google image

“Ultimately, understanding how your users interact with your site allows you to make important decisions about site content and effective use of your marketing and advertising resources,” Schnabl said.

He also suggested perusing the reports in Multi-Channel Funnels which focus on visitors’ “entire path to conversion.” This even includes the various  off-site interactions they had prior to making a purchase.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Google Analytics Tool Helps Businesses Track Customer Behavior, Appraise Own Performance

Google Analytics Tool Helps Businesses Track Customer Behavior, Appraise Own Performance – Goals Receives Substantial Update

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Google wants to help business owners measure their goals.

A recent upgrade of Goals in Google Analytics makes it easier for business owners to measure customer behavior as well as assess their own performances.

“Sales are just one possible goal—there are many other important interactions that may be valuable to your business, such as media plays, social connections, newsletter sign-ups, a minimum purchase value, or the amount of time spent on a screen,” Google Analytics product manager Stefan F. Schnabl wrote in a blog post.  “Using Goals, you can measure these types of engagement activities and track how these interactions help you to meet your larger business objectives.”

Live now in Goals in Google Analytics are a new set-up flow, new templates and new verification capabilities.

Here is how to get started:

• Goals are set at the profile level in Google Analytics accounts. To find a profile, click the Admin tab and then go to the account, property, and profile you want.

• Click Goals, then create a Goal.

• Follow the flow to set up and start measuring your Goals.

• For help setting up Goals, visit Google’s help center.

Google image

Google image

New templates

Both redesigned and new templates are available in the Goals set-up flow so users can quickly add important and “actionable” Goals to their Analytics account.

“When you use a template, the Goal setup flow is pre-filled with suggested values (based on your industry) that you can either keep or change as you walk through the process,” Schnabl said. The templates are organized into four business objectives (revenue, acquisition, inquiry, engagement) to help you think about the purpose of each Goal, plus you can still create custom goals.”

Schnabl said “revenue” goals don’t have to be a direct sale, but any user activity that has a significant impact on the owner’s business, such as a potential customer scheduling an appointment.

Schnabl also recommends business owners make sure they are using the template best suited for their companies. To choose or change templates, go to property settings to “choose the one that best describes your business.”

Verify Goals
A verify option exists at the end of the setup flow to enable users to see what the conversion rate would have been for the past seven days had a particular Goal been setup.

“Using the verify option gives you immediate feedback, so you can decide to save or modify the Goal configuration you’re working on,” he said.

Analyze Goals performance

The Goals Overview report, located under the Conversions section, allows users to see how their goal completions happen over time. Use the metric selector in the Goals Overview report to choose the relevant metric.

“Develop a sense how often a Goal conversion happens, and look to identify relationships between different Goals,” Schnabl said.

Schnabl gave some examples of how to analyze different goals:

• Select a single Goal and observe the performance over time. Use the date range selector and compare the Goal performance month on month, or quarter on quarter. This way you can compare seasonal trends, and the growth rate of your goal over time.

Google image

Google image

Selecting two Goal completion metrics next to each other will allow you to see correlational effects over time. A Goal measuring site engagement, like a media interaction, or a social share, could be indicative of a rise in sales.

Google image

Google image

“Ultimately, understanding how your users interact with your site allows you to make important decisions about site content and effective use of your marketing and advertising resources,” Schnabl said.

He also suggested perusing the reports in Multi-Channel Funnels which focus on visitors’ “entire path to conversion.” This even includes the various  off-site interactions they had prior to making a purchase.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Google Analytics Tool Helps Businesses Track Customer Behavior, Appraise Own Performance

Apple Says Galaxy S4, Google Now Breach Patents

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

Apple has added five new patents to its infringement lawsuit against Samsung — three are for its flagship Smartphone the Galaxy S4 and two are for Google Now for Android.

The current lawsuit addresses software and user interface patents, the main reason why Google, maker of the Android operating system, is being dragged into the dispute.

Apple alleges Samsung has violated additional patents, including the rights to the search technology integrated in the iPhone Siri voice feature.

“The Galaxy S4 product practices many of the same claims already asserted by Apple … in the same way as the already-accused Samsung devices,” the filing states.

Samsung Galaxy S4

Samsung Galaxy S4

Apple said it has had problems obtaining source code from Samsung and Google, despite serving the parties with a subpoena Sept. 28, 2012.

“Google (represented by the same law firm as Samsung) did not make available the bulk of its source code until March 31, 2013, and did not complete its production until May 13, 2013,” the filing reads.

“Despite diligent efforts, because of delays and issues with Samsung’s on-going production of source code, as well as delays in Google’s production of source code, Apple was only recently able to complete its analysis of the relevant confidential code.”

Apple said it investigated Google Play Books, Google Play Music, Google Play Movies and TV, Google Play Store and Android Market to determine sources of patent violation on Samsung devices.

Apple is to explain its motion in a June 25 hearing in a San Jose court before Judge Paul S. Grewal.

The patent violation case is scheduled for trial in March 2014, although it may be put on hold until after an appeals court resolves a separate lawsuit between the two companies — which could be some months away.

This will be the second major lawsuit Apple has launched against its rival.

A jury verdict last August found Samsung had violated six of Apple’s patents and ordered the South Korean company to pay Apple $1.05 billion. If the ruling holds up, it will set the record as the largest patent verdict in history.

Apple appealed for more than half a billion dollars in additional damages against Samsung for patent violation after losing its bid for a sales ban against 26 of Samsung handsets last fall.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Apple Says Galaxy S4, Google Now Breach Patents