Plain or Fancy Site Design: Which is Better?

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, SEO News, test

Every time you build a website, and every time you redesign a site, you make hundreds of small decisions against the backdrop of your overarching vision. You want to rank well, attract visitors, and gain conversions. To do this, should you use a fairly plain website design, or create something fancy?

This topic comes up in the SEO Chat forums from time to time; you can read the most recent thread dealing with this question. If you’ve designed your site correctly and managed all of the SEO-related issues properly (title tags, backlinks, content, and more), it should, in theory, be just as easy to rank a basic site as a fancier one. So why would you choose one kind of website design over the other?

One concern might be what you’re selling. Brick-and-mortar stores offer a certain kind of ambiance, in part to give shoppers an impression of what to expect from the goods they sell. You wouldn’t expect a Wal-Mart to display their pots and pans in the same way as a Williams-Sonoma, right?

The same thing may hold true for websites. Darrin Ward, founder of SEO Chat, thinks that this factor plays a role in sales. “My position is that if you’re selling normal non-luxurious goods, such as electronics, hardware, etc. then a more basic design will help conversion rates,” he explained. “If you are selling more luxurious goods or professional services (such as marketing consulting services), then a more flashy/modern design would do better.”

He doesn’t hold this position without some experience to back it up. He notes that “if you look at the numbers and some real stats (conversion rate, bounce rate, time-on-site, etc.),” more basic looking websites perform well, even out-performing flashier, newer-looking websites. Amazon and eBay of course come to mind as excellent examples.

There’s a phenomenon some site owners have noticed: after uploading what they believe is a very improved site design, the bounce rate will sometimes go up and sales may even go down noticeably. One relatively new SEO Chat forum member noted that the important thing to remember is to deliver the website’s message “in the most efficient, accessible, and beautiful way possible.” It could be that the design that looks better, or at least prettier, at first glance is in fact more confusing to your visitor. 

Site owners should also check to see how quickly their website loads with the new design as compared to the old one. No one wants to wait for anything online, so if you can speed up your page loads, you might decrease the number of bounces you get and increase conversions. For example, another fairly new SEO Chat forum member compared two of his websites: an old one that featured a lot of jQuery slide shows and fancy navigation, and a new one that simply included images and text, plain navigation and the like. The older site takes longer to load, but the newer site “gets much more traffic than my old one because all these fancy websites load longer so people tend to get a bit bored waiting…”

Long-time SEO Chat forum member Lb1878 said it best, though: keep it simple. “I think it comes down to personal preference and functionality…If I can find what I’m looking for easily, I’m happy. You should always keep your visitors at the forefront.”

So what should you do if you’re contemplating a site redesign? Lb1878 mentioned that it’s important to do A/B split testing and even use heat maps. “You should always compare the data from the old site to the new idea and see which one pays off. Google does offer some tools for this,” he explained, and added that there is third party software that will allow you to do heat map testing. So there’s no excuse for not collecting data before going live with a newly-redesigned website. Hopefully, doing so will allow you to avoid some costly mistakes. Good luck!

The post Plain or Fancy Site Design: Which is Better? appeared first on SEO Chat.

The Google EMD Update: Don’t Let Bad Search Happen to You!

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in test

If you’re a webmaster and have been impacted (penalized, lost traffic or have been caught in an algorithmic filter) from Google, the conclusion is obvious that Google isn’t trying to win a popularity contests with their user base lately.

First, it was the dawn of the web shattering Panda update (a content classifier designed to remove low quality web pages, websites that copied from other websites or weak internal pages with minimal value) from their index,  second, the backlink witch hunt / Penguin update (designed to demote websites from ranking highly which have off-topic or inbound links from low quality websites) and now the EMD update (the exact match domain update) which demotes websites which have exact match domains from easily ranking for their core keywords.

What’s an EMD?

While most savvy SEO’s or online marketing types understand the lingo, for those unfamiliar with the terminology, exact match domains are websites such as babycribs.com which in the past would rank rather easily for the key phrase “baby cribs”.

Exact match domains are typically highly sought from “Domaineers” (individuals who purchase, collect, monetize or sell domains) due to their ability to (1) rank highly in search engines with a fraction of the effort by the virtue of the domain name or (2) monetize those sites due to the commercial viability (since consumers easily commit the domain name to memory); that is, until the Google EMD update.

Before this update, there was a glaring loophole in search engines (Google in particular) which allowed exact match domains to rank uncontested with minimal SEO (sometimes within days of being created). So, instead of spending money on SEO, backlinks or promotion, businesses would often spend the money on acquiring a top level exact match domain.

The reason is simple, a website in the #1 position for an organic search phrase can garner 42-70% of the click through traffic for a keyword (compared to 2% in the number 10 position on the page); and since 7 out of 10 people typically click the organic results instead of paid (PPC) results, this is a major blow if dethroned from the #1 position or top 3 organic positions on the page.

Minor or Major Change?

On September 28th, avid SEO personality Barry Schwartz from SEO Round Table gleaned a tidbit of relevant info on the EMD update. Apparently, in a recent tweet by Matt Cutts (head of Google’s Web Spam Team) he states – “Minor weather report: small upcoming Google algo change will reduce low-quality “exact-match” domains in search results.

Cutts later tweeted – “New exact-match domain (EMD) algo affects 0.6% of English-US queries to a noticeable degree. Unrelated to Panda/Penguin”.

Now your first thought, 0.6 that’s not so bad right? That all depends on the sheer volume of total English-US queries, and, if that number is theoretically 100,000,000,000 queries per day (100 billion), that represents 60 million potential queries affected daily by this change.

There’s nothing minor about this or any other algorithm, infrastructure or classifier change in a search engines’ index, more specifically, this is the equivalent of Hurricane Katrina to a small business or website not fortified by alternative traffic or citation sources.

While most webmasters may not own an EMD or rely strictly on the ranking power of an exact match domain alone; if you do own a full or partial hyphenated EMD and your website’s major keywords disappear, your revenue is and business model are inevitably impacted instantly.

As far as chain reactions go, once rankings dip, your cash flow could tank or you could inevitably go out of business, unless you have a plan B for traffic (particularly in this economy).

Based on the inquiries we have received for the past 6 months from companies in need of solutions to Google changes, most webmasters (business owners, individuals and affiliates alike), do not have a plan B and are puzzled, frustrated, agitated or struggling to determine what happened to their traffic, what they did or did not do and, most of all why now, when things were just fine before the latest monkey wrench tweak. Was it a competitor throwing a batch of bad links from negative SEO, or did they simply trip a filter and get hit with a penalty?

In either case, it’s dangerous for webmasters to blindly assume that once you attain a high ranking position for your primary keyword (exact match domain or otherwise) that your website won’t be churned off the page (from an update, filter or algorithm change).

Often, it’s not even your site being penalized; it’s the other sites that linked to yours that took the hit (and your website is no longer buoyant in the search results as a result). Keep in mind that when they purge their index many of the sites that were holding other sites up (by virtue of their citation/links) have been caught (essentially algorithmically neutered) from passing link flow to other websites.

Since citation leaves a footprint, if your website happened to receive sustenance from an algorithmically compromised website, then, like a chain of dominos, the link-flow dropped off. Essentially, you start from zero again and fall to the back of the line (rolled back 5-10 pages in the search results) or sometimes worse (not ranking at all for the keyword).

The point is, there are no guarantees when it comes to how search engines tally links, popularity, relevance and value, it’s merely their perception of what they think their users want. What Google forgets is, it’s those same users who own websites and have become dependent on that traffic for their business who are getting thrown under the bus and have no idea why.

This process has gone on for years and quite frankly, people are getting tired of running the gauntlet and trying to appease their new rules (starting with things like adding nofollow attributes to all outbound links) because Google couldn’t detect link intent i.e. “paid links” with their algorithm and wanted to impose using nofollow to webmasters to add nofollow attributes to all outbound links (using the fear of penalties) as a consequence.

Over time, Google just kept a plethora of updates coming (in the name or relevancy) from the Florida Update, the Big Daddy Update, the May Day Update, The Vince Update, the Panda Update, Penguin Update, etc., enough is enough already.

Is SEO Still Important?

Is SEO still important? Yes and No!

SEO is important if you have (1) implemented conversion optimization first, so that regardless of where your traffic emanates from, it will result in increased ROI (return on investment)  via more subscriptions, social engagement (viral traffic) or sales and (2) If you have the budget and / or staff to afford implementing the often tedious work associated with SEO.

SEO is NOT important if want to spend more money on Television, Radio, Newspaper ads, Pay-Per-Click, have a strong offline marketing push. While Google’s claim for making these changes is relevancy, their motivation has transcended “building the best search engine” and has become something far more transparent (scrub compromise the organic search results and focus on paid search which provides approximately 98% of all profits for Google).

How Do You Get Ranked?

After perfecting your on page SEO, a large portion of the SEO process is based on developing sufficient website authority through exceeding the algorithmic tipping point for on page content (with the quality of that content now being equally as important as the volume and frequency).

Essentially, since articles don’t write themselves, you’ll need an in-house subject matter expert or a knowledgeable writer or team of writers if you intend on developing the authority site model.  Instead of building and relying on backlinks, create content that is worthy to garner its own links or leverage the on page authority and trust your website has to catapult past less authoritative websites in your way.

Keep in mind, developing authority is a lengthy process that requires commitment and dedication to quality and consistency (always providing users’ value instead of rehashing vague fodder). Also remember that nothing happens overnight with SEO (most sustainable results can take months), in short, it’s all about planting and sowing the results over time.

If your content is stellar, people will share it (if you give them a nudge) and the social sharing has tremendous weight in the new algorithm (to expedite authority for the page and hence the site).

If you plan on using the three strategies outlined above, then SEO is important. Otherwise, you may have to seek alternative traffic sources to offset dependency on Google’s organic traffic as a life vein for your business.

SEO Bizarro World

Is the epic battle of giants affecting your business?

Me Facebook Beat You Google

Image courtesy of (comic coverage).

In this Bizarro world where Google wants to be more social and Facebook is talking about creating their own search engine, be worried, be very worried since core competencies exist for a reason.

The rise and fall of search results for webmasters may result in a requiem for search engines, since consumers can easily “jump ship” and find the next big thing and find new ways to get what they want.

Let’s just say that backlash is an understatement and when the search bubble bursts (and it will), I wouldn’t want to be in aisle 5 (if you catch my drift). I’m sure Myspace, Digg and other once popular websites never saw it coming as they were displaced by a fickle (or bored) user base or lots of savvy emerging competitors who introduced something equally viable to woo their users away. The end result,  their traffic sources (repeat visitors) dried up (like dust in the wind).

While search does not exclusively belong to Google, quality matters and the importance and credibility of organic results is what delivers the most traffic from repeat visitors.

If the quality and relevancy suffers, the site loses its value. In my opinion, that is how I view Google’s search results, quite simply, they have filtered so many things that good sites along with the bad have been suppressed (which translates to a poor user experience). I find myself having to refine my searches more and more, since the results on the first page are NOT what I am looking for and often are so far off topic I am amazed how it surfaced.

Don’t Let Bad Search Happen to You!

So, not to go all “fist of goodness” on you here (props to direct TV vs. cable ads) but, this is one thing for both Google and users alike to keep in mind.

When people lose confidence in search engines, the less people search, the less people search, the less valuable the paid ads become, the less valuable the paid ads become the more a search engine tries to justify its position to those paying for ads, the more a search engine tries to justify its position for those paying for ads, the more changes, penalties or adjustments are enforced through “the index vs. the content in the index” which affects its organic user base, the more changes, penalties or adjustments are made that affect the organic user base, the less users will depend on search engines.

Don’t let bad search happen to you, don’t rely strictly on search engines…

The Google EMD Update: Don’t Let Bad Search Happen to You!

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Blogging News, Google News, SEO News, test

If you’re a webmaster and have been impacted (penalized, lost traffic or have been caught in an algorithmic filter) from Google, the conclusion is obvious that Google isn’t trying to win a popularity contests with their user base lately.

First, it was the dawn of the web shattering Panda update (a content classifier designed to remove low quality web pages, websites that copied from other websites or weak internal pages with minimal value) from their index,  second, the backlink witch hunt / Penguin update (designed to demote websites from ranking highly which have off-topic or inbound links from low quality websites) and now the EMD update (the exact match domain update) which demotes websites which have exact match domains from easily ranking for their core keywords.

What’s an EMD?

While most savvy SEO’s or online marketing types understand the lingo, for those unfamiliar with the terminology, exact match domains are websites such as babycribs.com which in the past would rank rather easily for the key phrase “baby cribs”.

Exact match domains are typically highly sought from “Domaineers” (individuals who purchase, collect, monetize or sell domains) due to their ability to (1) rank highly in search engines with a fraction of the effort by the virtue of the domain name or (2) monetize those sites due to the commercial viability (since consumers easily commit the domain name to memory); that is, until the Google EMD update.

Before this update, there was a glaring loophole in search engines (Google in particular) which allowed exact match domains to rank uncontested with minimal SEO (sometimes within days of being created). So, instead of spending money on SEO, backlinks or promotion, businesses would often spend the money on acquiring a top level exact match domain.

The reason is simple, a website in the #1 position for an organic search phrase can garner 42-70% of the click through traffic for a keyword (compared to 2% in the number 10 position on the page); and since 7 out of 10 people typically click the organic results instead of paid (PPC) results, this is a major blow if dethroned from the #1 position or top 3 organic positions on the page.

Minor or Major Change?

On September 28th, avid SEO personality Barry Schwartz from SEO Round Table gleaned a tidbit of relevant info on the EMD update. Apparently, in a recent tweet by Matt Cutts (head of Google’s Web Spam Team) he states – “Minor weather report: small upcoming Google algo change will reduce low-quality “exact-match” domains in search results.

Cutts later tweeted – “New exact-match domain (EMD) algo affects 0.6% of English-US queries to a noticeable degree. Unrelated to Panda/Penguin”.

Now your first thought, 0.6 that’s not so bad right? That all depends on the sheer volume of total English-US queries, and, if that number is theoretically 100,000,000,000 queries per day (100 billion), that represents 60 million potential queries affected daily by this change.

There’s nothing minor about this or any other algorithm, infrastructure or classifier change in a search engines’ index, more specifically, this is the equivalent of Hurricane Katrina to a small business or website not fortified by alternative traffic or citation sources.

While most webmasters may not own an EMD or rely strictly on the ranking power of an exact match domain alone; if you do own a full or partial hyphenated EMD and your website’s major keywords disappear, your revenue is and business model are inevitably impacted instantly.

As far as chain reactions go, once rankings dip, your cash flow could tank or you could inevitably go out of business, unless you have a plan B for traffic (particularly in this economy).

Based on the inquiries we have received for the past 6 months from companies in need of solutions to Google changes, most webmasters (business owners, individuals and affiliates alike), do not have a plan B and are puzzled, frustrated, agitated or struggling to determine what happened to their traffic, what they did or did not do and, most of all why now, when things were just fine before the latest monkey wrench tweak. Was it a competitor throwing a batch of bad links from negative SEO, or did they simply trip a filter and get hit with a penalty?

In either case, it’s dangerous for webmasters to blindly assume that once you attain a high ranking position for your primary keyword (exact match domain or otherwise) that your website won’t be churned off the page (from an update, filter or algorithm change).

Often, it’s not even your site being penalized; it’s the other sites that linked to yours that took the hit (and your website is no longer buoyant in the search results as a result). Keep in mind that when they purge their index many of the sites that were holding other sites up (by virtue of their citation/links) have been caught (essentially algorithmically neutered) from passing link flow to other websites.

Since citation leaves a footprint, if your website happened to receive sustenance from an algorithmically compromised website, then, like a chain of dominos, the link-flow dropped off. Essentially, you start from zero again and fall to the back of the line (rolled back 5-10 pages in the search results) or sometimes worse (not ranking at all for the keyword).

The point is, there are no guarantees when it comes to how search engines tally links, popularity, relevance and value, it’s merely their perception of what they think their users want. What Google forgets is, it’s those same users who own websites and have become dependent on that traffic for their business who are getting thrown under the bus and have no idea why.

This process has gone on for years and quite frankly, people are getting tired of running the gauntlet and trying to appease their new rules (starting with things like adding nofollow attributes to all outbound links) because Google couldn’t detect link intent i.e. “paid links” with their algorithm and wanted to impose using nofollow to webmasters to add nofollow attributes to all outbound links (using the fear of penalties) as a consequence.

Over time, Google just kept a plethora of updates coming (in the name or relevancy) from the Florida Update, the Big Daddy Update, the May Day Update, The Vince Update, the Panda Update, Penguin Update, etc., enough is enough already.

Is SEO Still Important?

Is SEO still important? Yes and No!

SEO is important if you have (1) implemented conversion optimization first, so that regardless of where your traffic emanates from, it will result in increased ROI (return on investment)  via more subscriptions, social engagement (viral traffic) or sales and (2) If you have the budget and / or staff to afford implementing the often tedious work associated with SEO.

SEO is NOT important if want to spend more money on Television, Radio, Newspaper ads, Pay-Per-Click, have a strong offline marketing push. While Google’s claim for making these changes is relevancy, their motivation has transcended “building the best search engine” and has become something far more transparent (scrub compromise the organic search results and focus on paid search which provides approximately 98% of all profits for Google).

How Do You Get Ranked?

After perfecting your on page SEO, a large portion of the SEO process is based on developing sufficient website authority through exceeding the algorithmic tipping point for on page content (with the quality of that content now being equally as important as the volume and frequency).

Essentially, since articles don’t write themselves, you’ll need an in-house subject matter expert or a knowledgeable writer or team of writers if you intend on developing the authority site model.  Instead of building and relying on backlinks, create content that is worthy to garner its own links or leverage the on page authority and trust your website has to catapult past less authoritative websites in your way.

Keep in mind, developing authority is a lengthy process that requires commitment and dedication to quality and consistency (always providing users’ value instead of rehashing vague fodder). Also remember that nothing happens overnight with SEO (most sustainable results can take months), in short, it’s all about planting and sowing the results over time.

If your content is stellar, people will share it (if you give them a nudge) and the social sharing has tremendous weight in the new algorithm (to expedite authority for the page and hence the site).

If you plan on using the three strategies outlined above, then SEO is important. Otherwise, you may have to seek alternative traffic sources to offset dependency on Google’s organic traffic as a life vein for your business.

SEO Bizarro World

Is the epic battle of giants affecting your business?

Me Facebook Beat You Google

Image courtesy of (comic coverage).

In this Bizarro world where Google wants to be more social and Facebook is talking about creating their own search engine, be worried, be very worried since core competencies exist for a reason.

The rise and fall of search results for webmasters may result in a requiem for search engines, since consumers can easily “jump ship” and find the next big thing and find new ways to get what they want.

Let’s just say that backlash is an understatement and when the search bubble bursts (and it will), I wouldn’t want to be in aisle 5 (if you catch my drift). I’m sure Myspace, Digg and other once popular websites never saw it coming as they were displaced by a fickle (or bored) user base or lots of savvy emerging competitors who introduced something equally viable to woo their users away. The end result,  their traffic sources (repeat visitors) dried up (like dust in the wind).

While search does not exclusively belong to Google, quality matters and the importance and credibility of organic results is what delivers the most traffic from repeat visitors.

If the quality and relevancy suffers, the site loses its value. In my opinion, that is how I view Google’s search results, quite simply, they have filtered so many things that good sites along with the bad have been suppressed (which translates to a poor user experience). I find myself having to refine my searches more and more, since the results on the first page are NOT what I am looking for and often are so far off topic I am amazed how it surfaced.

Don’t Let Bad Search Happen to You!

So, not to go all “fist of goodness” on you here (props to direct TV vs. cable ads) but, this is one thing for both Google and users alike to keep in mind.

When people lose confidence in search engines, the less people search, the less people search, the less valuable the paid ads become, the less valuable the paid ads become the more a search engine tries to justify its position to those paying for ads, the more a search engine tries to justify its position for those paying for ads, the more changes, penalties or adjustments are enforced through “the index vs. the content in the index” which affects its organic user base, the more changes, penalties or adjustments are made that affect the organic user base, the less users will depend on search engines.

Don’t let bad search happen to you, don’t rely strictly on search engines…

Related Posts

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  2. Moving Past the Google Panda Update!
  3. Google Page Rank Update – Use It or Lose It!
  4. Google Toolbar PageRank Update October 2009
  5. Google Toolbar Page Rank Update September 2008

Google EMD, Panda, Penguin Filters Hit At Same Time

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, test

Google’s late September modification brought many site owners up short because it targeted something Google hadn’t yet attacked: exact match domains. Danny Sullivan provides a thoughtful and extensive review of it over at Search Engine Land. He believes this EMD update will become a regular filter, much like Panda, and eventually be updated every month. To understand what the EMD update did, you need to understand that Google has historically given a boost – albeit a very small boost – to websites whose domain names exactly match the query performed by a search. So cheapwidgets.com might sh…

Google EMD, Panda, Penguin Filters Hit At Same Time

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, SEO News, test

Starting September 27, a perfect storm of updates and filters from Google made many websites lose their rankings in the search engine, dropping like lead through pages and pages of positions. It left SEOs and site owners with quite a tangle to tease through, just to figure out which update caused the drop.

Google’s late September modification brought many site owners up short because it targeted something Google hadn’t yet attacked: exact match domains. Danny Sullivan provides a thoughtful and extensive review of it over at Search Engine Land. He believes this EMD update will become a regular filter, much like Panda, and eventually be updated every month.

To understand what the EMD update did, you need to understand that Google has historically given a boost – albeit a very small boost – to websites whose domain names exactly match the query performed by a search. So “cheapwidgets.com” might show up at or near the top of the search results for the query “cheap widgets.” The cheapwidgets.com website still needed to deliver some kind of content, mind you, but with an exact match domain it could, conceivably, beat out other websites with better content whose domains didn’t exactly match the keyword.

Google created the EMD update to address this issue. It’s important to note that not all EMDs suffered from this update; indeed, some actually went up in the rankings. Why the difference? Sullivan notes that “plenty of people have purchased exact match domains in  hopes of a ranking boost and have also put in the time and effort to populate these sites with quality content…EMD domains aren’t being targeted; EMD domains with bad content are.”

On SEO Chat, you can find a number of threads discussing the EMD update; here’s one of the longest. It’s been tricky trying to figure out what’s going on – and for a good reason. Google released its EMD update on September 28. But the search giant did a thorough update of its Panda  filter on September 27.

This Panda update wasn’t simply a case of Google pouring websites through its Panda filter. As Barry Schwartz explained, “This is a fairly major Panda update that impacts 2.4% of English search queries” and took several days to roll out fully. For the record, this was the twentieth Panda update since Google first began using the filter back in February 2011. This particular update affects a greater percentage of queries than any other Panda update since at least October of last year.

Why did Google roll out both of these updates at nearly the same time? Sullivan pointed out that both Panda and the EMD update target websites with thin or bad content. Apparently, Panda didn’t flush out EMDs with poor content well enough to satisfy the search engine, so now “Google pours all the sites it knows about through a Panda strainer. After that, it pours what didn’t get caught in that strainer through the EMD filter,” Sullivan theorizes.

As if getting a double whammy from EMD and Panda wasn’t bad enough, Google compounded an already-confusing situation for site owners and SEOs by unleashing a Penguin update on October 5. Matt McGee reported on this for Search Engine Land. The Penguin filter, you may recall, targets websites with lots of low-quality links. It went active in April of this year; Google updated it a month later, and seems to have left it alone after that – until now.

Google’s head of webspam Matt Cutts tweeted that this Penguin update would affect 0.3% of English-language queries “to a noticeable degree.” What is a noticeable effect? According to this Twitter conversation between Cutts and UK SEO Rob Watts, it refers to changes that occur “above the fold.” A searcher might not notice if the result in position 10 on page 1 is swapped out for a different result – but if the first five results change, it’s a different story.

With three different updates going live on Google over the course of two weeks, what’s a site owner to do? How can an SEO sort out why any particular website took a plunge in the SERPs? Some SEOs seem to think that this is part of Google’s game – spread confusion and keep everyone guessing, so site builders will simply fall back on creating great content and other white hat practices. To be honest, many of those who have continued to build their sites along those lines have at least maintained their rankings, or even seen them improve as their competitors’ standings took a nosedive. It’s something to think about, anyway. Good luck!

The post Google EMD, Panda, Penguin Filters Hit At Same Time appeared first on SEO Chat.

Google Updates Webmaster Guidelines

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Blogging News, Google News, test

You can check out the official announcement in Google’s webmaster blog; the new set of guidelines is also easy to locate. I’m mildly disappointed that Google didn’t set this up with a little bit of AJAX. So many of the items listed under the quality guidelines link elsewhere; it would have been nice to click that link and just have the page scroll down to read that item. Both our basic quality guidelines and many of our more specific article (like those on links schemes or hidden text) have been reorganized and expanded to provide you with more information about how to create quality websites…

Malware Recovery: What to Do When Google Says You`ve Been Hacked

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, test

No, your staff didn’t mess up the page or fumble the server, your site was compromised. Through various methods, a hacker has accessed your website, uploaded malicious code and skipped out. Now, your visitors may get their computers infected and your search engine rankings might be at risk. So, what do you do? Continue reading; let’s study the psychology and reasoning of such attacks. What is a site hack? Why does it happen? This might be a pretty obvious question. Why would somebody install malware or a virus on a website/computer? Ninety percent of the time it’s for financial gain. Ten perc…

ICM Registry Launches XXX Search Engine

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, test

Unlike searching for erotic content in Google, however, Search.xxx lets users search only those sites that end in .xxx. This particular global top-level domain, just approved by ICANN in March of last year, has been designated for adult-themed content. The general public began registering .xxx TLDs for their websites in December 2011. As you might guess, ICM Registry administers the .xxx TLD. The Search.xxx search engine differs in another important way from Google: its goal isn’t to make money with ads – not directly, anyway. The registry’s plan involves driving traffic to the search engine. …

Google Can Read Dynamic FAQs

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, SEO News, test

This question came up in an SEO Chat forums thread recently. Dynamic FAQ pages list all of the questions in their default state, but none of the answers. When a user clicks on the question, the page opens up at that point, and the answer to the question scrolls down neatly. It’s a nice feature for users. It means they aren’t confronted with a wall of text. Because of this, it’s easier for them to find the answer to their one question without having to hunt through a lot of other questions and answers. So from a human usability perspective, dynamic FAQs are a great idea. But what about from a…

All Links Cost Something

Written by: admin Date of published: . Posted in Google News, SEO News, test

It’s inevitable, I suppose, that those who’ve just discovered SEO – or even those who’ve been at it for a while – will wonder what’s wrong with paid links. They’ll even ask about it in our SEO Chat forums, as you can see at the link. The first point that comes to mind, of course, is that paid links purchased in order to manipulate your standing in Google’s SERPs are explicitly against the search engine’s terms of service. Period. If you want to pay for a link on a website just because its traffic might be interested in what you have to offer, that’s different. Say you restore and sell muscle …